Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TomBAvoider

Important Rejuvenation Result - Blood Plasma Rejuvenation!

Recommended Posts

This strikes me as a very important result. Everyone knows about parabiosis - but the fundamental question was regarding the mechanism:

1)Was it substances from the YOUNG mouse that rejuvinated the old mouse

or

2)Substances from the OLD mouse that were diluted by blood from the young mouse

This new result argues strongly and IMO convincingly that it's the second scenario.

This is a very exciting result. It means that senolytics is the way to go forward, to get results, at least in the short term. And incidentally, this particular procedure seems easy and with minimal side effects.

Here's the expermiment and result, and well worth reading the whole article

Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue, reverses aging in mice

"They found that the plasma exchange process acts almost like a molecular reset button, lowering the concentrations of a number of pro-inflammatory proteins that become elevated with age, while allowing more beneficial proteins, like those that promote vascularization, to rebound in large numbers."

Edited by TomBAvoider
sp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating!

One possible complication:  When diluting the blood, you are also removing half of your platelets.  There is evidence that CR causes mild "anemia" -- a slight deficiency in blood platelets -- at least that is true for me. 

Probably not a big problem -- quite possibly the dilution procedure will also jack up platelet formation.

 --  Saul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Saul said:

One possible complication:  When diluting the blood, you are also removing half of your platelets.  There is evidence that CR causes mild "anemia" -- a slight deficiency in blood platelets -- at least that is true for me. 

Maybe I have misunderstood this article, but to me it sounds like they are only diluting the plasma, not the whole blood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read the full article.  There is no mention of saving the platelets in the half of the body's blood that is discarded.  If those platelets were to be saved, how?  I'm no plegmologist (spelling🙂?), but I think that may be hard to do, without damaging the platelets (probably not a good idea).

Also:  The article claims that, after discarding half the blood and replacing with saline and albumin, the remaining cells are activated, producing more useful protein.  Perhaps the rejuvenated blood might also easily replace the discarded platelets.

  --  Saul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Saul said:

One possible complication:  When diluting the blood, you are also removing half of your platelets.  There is evidence that CR causes mild "anemia" -- a slight deficiency in blood platelets -- at least that is true for me.

From the materials and methods section of the paper:

Quote

Blood samples were centrifuged spun at 500g for 5 minutes. The platelet rich plasma fractions were carefully removed, blood cell pellets were resuspended in normal saline and then spun down once more at 500 g for an additional 5 minutes. The saline layer was removed, and blood cell pellets were then resuspended in an equal volume of 5% MSA in normal saline

Sounds like they are removing platelets and I didn't see anything suggesting they put them back later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the clarification! I'm definitely feeling my limits as a layperson to understand the intricacies of this science.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it's new to all of us.  Certainly sounds interesting.  Possibly investigators might figure out what are the proteins that are best to reduce (by this dilution procedure).  Exactly where it will lead remains uncertain.

But I'm sure that there will be some $$ made by professionals who present videos of their : "dilution lab":  "pay me money and I'll dilute your blood".  --  Saul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I imagine the next step is to identify which molecules are the ones which are responsible for the effect, by systematically adding them, one by one and in combinations and seeing when the mice are affected. Once you have a list of compounds that the body produces and which are delterious, then you can take that information and see if the production of some of these might not be blocked upstream - I'd guess that way we'd discover more senolytics, and perhaps after running some studies we might find the ones which are beneficial without side effects.

It's an exciting discovery, but I doubt it's very practical at this stage as far as implementation - meanwhile, one can hope more research can be funded to turn this into something practical wrt. new senolytics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) So far it is just one study (although it builds on others)

1) So far it is just in mice.

But one reason to be hopeful is that the procedure already exists and is quite common I think. Basically not that much different from when people donate blood or plasma. Hopefully there will be a way to lower the costs, but if this really does slow or even reverse aging, it will be highly cost effective in terms of preventing other, much more costly, age related illness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TomBAvoider said:

to identify which molecules are the ones which are responsible for the effect,

First:  We don't know what all the proteins in blood are.  That alone may be a difficult, if not impossible, task.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Saul said:

When diluting the blood, you are also removing half of your platelets.  There is evidence that CR causes mild "anemia" -- a slight deficiency in blood platelets -- at least that is true for me.  Probably not a big problem -- quite possibly the dilution procedure will also jack up platelet formation.

In any case,  the lifespan of  platelets is 8-10 days.  Around 10% of fresh platelets are  introduced into circulating blood every day, being constantly produced from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow.

Platelet function has been extensively analyzed in aspirin studies.
 

Quote

 

[Aspirin]  irreversibly inhibits COX-1 by acetylation of serine-530 and induces a long-lasting functional defect in the platelets.

[...] Because platelets cannot generate new COX, the effects of aspirin last for the duration of the life of the platelet [10 days].

After a single dose of aspirin, platelet COX activity recovers by 10% per day in parallel with platelet turnover. Although it may take 10 days for the total platelet population to be renewed, it has been shown that if as few as 20% of the platelets have normal COX activity, hemostasis may be normal.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

In any case,  the lifespan of  platelets is 8-10 days.  Around 10% of fresh platelets are  introduced into circulating blood every day, being constantly produced from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow.

This is true. I am wondering if the observed effects are transient?

On a somewhat related note:

Experimental effect of different dilutions of blood with human plasma protein fraction and large dose factor one on blood coagulation and chemistry in vitro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×