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elatedsquirrel

Receptor makes mice strong and slim

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Interesting article:

https://www.uni-bonn.de/news/144-2020

Quote

As they age, mice increasingly lose muscle mass - similar to humans. And just like us, they also tend to gain a lot of fat around the hips over the years. However, if they receive the agonist that activates the A2B receptor, these aging effects are inhibited: Their oxygen consumption (an indicator of energy dissiption) increases by almost half; moreover, after four weeks of treatment they have as much muscle mass as a young animal. "A2B activation can therefore reverse both aging effects to a certain extent," explains Gnad.

In order to see whether the results were also meaningful for humans, the researchers examined human cell cultures and tissue samples. They found that in people with a large number of A2B receptors, the brown adipose tissue works at a higher rate. At the same time, their muscle cells consume more energy, which may indicate that they are also more active and may be more likely to be regenerated.

 

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I'd be curious if activating A2B through added agonist has any effect on the proliferation and growth of cancer cells too, which is often the case with such interventions.

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7 hours ago, elatedsquirrel said:

So basically "stopping ageing gives you cancer"?

LOL.  It's not a rule, but it has been known to happen  -- sometimes too much of a good thing is not so good.

Shooting up testosterone will also increase lean mass and muscle, at least for a while, but in the end, it will come back to bite you.

Not saying this is the same, just that we don't really know.

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