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CJay

Blood Panel

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Hello everyone, 

I am terrible at social media engagement but I do read your posts and appreciate everyone here. It seems like such a supportive community. 

I have a question I’m a little reticent to ask- I’m curious if anyone has persistently low levels of certain things on a general blood panel, or if this is a me problem? I also don’t really understand if it’s a problem. 

Ny urea nitrogen and creatinine is always low (idk if I spelled that right) and my sodium is usually between 131-133 while I think normal is considered 134.  Personally, I thought this could just be individual variability but some doctors are fine with them and others sound alarm bells and make me retake weekly panels (which is how I know the numbers are super consistent).  

Anyway- thanks for your input! 

CJ

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12 hours ago, CJay said:

urea nitrogen and creatinine is always low

CR may lower creatinine levels, mine have certainly dropped to 0.6 as of the last test.  Perhaps someone more knowledgeable on this would have a better explanation.

But generally, creatinine levels tend to increase as we get older, so depending on how low yours are, I probably wouldn't fret much about it.  My doctor thinks 0.6 is actually good.

In fact, if you enter your creatinine level in this phenotypic age spreadsheet, you'll find that with lower creatinine, both your phenotypic and DNAm age numbers drop, as well as your predicted mortality score.  For what it's worth, of course :)

Edited by Ron Put

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My cardiologist laughed at me when I told him I was concerned about low creatine on my blood test. He said nonsense low is good! He is a big promoter of Dean Ornish and plant based diets. He is himself a vegan.

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1 hour ago, Mike41 said:

My cardiologist laughed at me when I told him I was concerned about low creatine on my blood test. He said nonsense low is good! He is a big promoter of Dean Ornish and plant based diets. He is himself a vegan.

That's wonderful that you have a plant-based cardiologist. Can I ask what led you to see one? Was there something specific that led to your referral or just a general desire to see one? I have a few things that are regularly low on my blood work, like white blood cells, testosterone, platelets, and neutrophil. I think it's probably okay that they are low, though I continue to keep an eye out should I change my stance on this. 

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On 6/27/2020 at 9:12 AM, Ron Put said:

CR may lower creatinine levels, mine have certainly dropped to 0.6 as of the last test.  Perhaps someone more knowledgeable on this would have a better explanation.

But generally, creatinine levels tend to increase as we get older, so depending on how low yours are, I probably wouldn't fret much about it.  My doctor thinks 0.6 is actually good.

In fact, if you enter your creatinine level in this phenotypic age spreadsheet, you'll find that with lower creatinine, both your phenotypic and DNAm age numbers drop, as well as your predicted mortality score.  For what it's worth, of course :)

Wow, thank you for showing me this! Yes, my doctors have never been worried about it it was simply interesting to me.  I appreciate these links!

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Table 1.

Oxidative Modifications of Biomolecules Associated with Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Their Corresponding Methods of Detection

Modification Detection method References
Intracellular ROS DCF assay Hafer et al. (138)
Intracellular RNS Chemiluminescence Wardman (352)
DNA SSBs and DSBs TUNEL, Comet, FISH, MS Weimann et al. (354)
8-oxodG ELISA, IHC Rossner and Sram (289)
Lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) HPLC Miyazawa et al. (233); Yamamoto (368)
  Phosphine (DPPP) Okimoto et al. (252)
  Hydrazine with MS Milic et al. (229, 230)
Hydroxynonenal (HNE) HPLC/fluorescence Tanaka et al. (326)
HNE, MDA, Acrolein GC-MS Kawai et al. (169)
Acrolein-DNA adducts UHPLC-MS/MS Yin et al. (374)
Protein radicals EPR Gordy and Miyagawa (129); Symons and Taiwo (320)
Protein carbonylation DNPH antibody Yan and Forster (369)
  DNPH with radiolabeling Lenz et al. (199)
  DNPH with MS detection Guo and Prokai (136); Bernevic et al. (30); Bollineni et al. (43)
  GPR with MS detection Mirzaei and Regnier (232)
  Label free MS detection Rauniyar et al. (276)
  Gel fluorescence Madian and Regnier (219); Tamarit et al. (324)
  Biotin-conjugated probes Chavez et al. (59); Chung et al. (70)
Methionine sulfoxide (MetO) Infrared spectroscopy Ravi et al. (277)
  MetO antibody Nakaso et al. (246)
  Label-free MS detection Guan et al. (135); Xiang et al. (363)
Reversibly oxidized Cys (SOH, SS, SNO, SN) and tailored for nitrosated Cys Switch-tag (OxICAT) Leichert et al. (197); Sethuraman et al. (301)
  NOxICAT Lindemann and Leichert (207)
S-nitrosocysteine (CySNO) Switch-tag Lu et al. (213); Greco et al. (132); Camerini et al. (52)
  On-resin (SNO-RAC) Forrester et al. (111)
  Phosphine probes Wang and Xian (347); Bechtold et al. (21); Zhang et al. (381)
Cysteine sulfenic acid (CySOH) Switch-tag Saurin et al. (295)
  CySOH antibody Seo and Carroll (300)
  1,3-Dicarbonyls: fluorescent Poole et al. (267)
  1,3-Dicarbonyls: biotinylated Charles et al. (57); Poole et al. (267); Klomsiri et al. (178); Nelson et al. (248); Qian et al. (271)
  1,3-Dicarbonyls: click chem. Reddie et al. (278); Leonard et al. (200); Seo and Carroll (299); Qian et al. (272)

8-oxodG, 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine; DCF, dichlorofluorescein; DNPH, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine; DPPP, diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine; DSB, double-strand break; ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; EPR, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy; FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization; GC-MS, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry; GPR, Girard's P reagent; HPLC, high-performance liquid chromatography; IHC, immunohistochemistry; MDA, malondialdehyde; MS, mass spectrometry; NOxICAT, isotope-coded affinity tag for detecting nitrosated and oxidized cysteine; OxICAT, isotope-coded affinity tag for detecting oxidized cysteine; RNS, reactive nitrogen species; ROS, reactive oxygen species; SNO-RAC, resin-assisted capture for S-nitrosothiols; SSB, single-strand break; TUNEL, terminal transferase; UHPLC-MS/MS, ultra high-performance LC coupled to tandem MS.

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On 6/27/2020 at 8:25 PM, drewab said:

That's wonderful that you have a plant-based cardiologist. Can I ask what led you to see one? Was there something specific that led to your referral or just a general desire to see one? I have a few things that are regularly low on my blood work, like white blood cells, testosterone, platelets, and neutrophil. I think it's probably okay that they are low, though I continue to keep an eye out should I change my stance on this. 

Sorry I just saw this! To answer your question the cardiologist is a personal friend of mine. I met him several years ago through a close Friend who I often attend Carnegie author series lectures. It so happened that he invited this cardiologist to a lecture he was particularly interested in attending and we hit it off. We resonated I guess you’d say. Well as I got to know him I decided might as well be his patient.

Edited by Mike41

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https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/08/a-type-of-phosphorylated-tau-in-blood-samples-indicates-amyloid-%ce%b2-aggregation-prior-to-symptoms/

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