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elatedsquirrel

Nutritionally complete meal?

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Does anyone have any recipes for "nutritionally complete" meals? i.e. a meal that you could eat 3 times a day, 365 days a year, and be optimally healthy in terms of nutrition.

A big buddha bowl of randomness is totally acceptable.

Ideally, should be:

  • Easy to make
  • High in fibre
  • Low GI
  • Filling
  • Palatable (but doesn't have to taste amazing)
  • Scalable (i.e. easy to just scale the ingredients to make more if you need more or fewer calories)
  • Can be vegan, but doesn't have to be - fish, seafood, eggs or dairy are acceptable
  • Ingredients that I can get from the supermarket, or order from Holland and Barrett.

I'm not actually going to eat the same thing every day all year, but I'm looking to simplify my life, and having the option to make a great big batch of something a few days a week and just eat that for the rest of the day would be helpful.

Thanks!

Edited by elatedsquirrel

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An interesting issue of optimization, although pretty drastic. In theory, it's very easy to design such a plan with cronometer if the big buddha bowl concept is adopted. The following is a sample that meets your requirements with 2100 kCAL, of course any variation is possible. This is a pro-longevity, pro-healthspan design if it can be adhered to. Protein is slightly high but most of it is plant-based.

To be divided in 2 or 3 parts. Note: pretty stoic diet. Little left to taste pleasure. Good to loose weight. Not for anorexics.

 

 

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Edited by mccoy

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Thanks for the recipe! I'm going to scale it down for lunch and give it a go one of these days! The only thing is I'm not sure if you can get collard greens in the UK (or if so, what we call them here). Are "spring greens" the same thing?

(The only downside is a lot of opened barely eaten cans of beans! 😀)

2 hours ago, mccoy said:

Note: pretty stoic diet. Little left to taste pleasure.

You say that, but the other day I couldn't be bothered to cook properly, so I steamed / boiled some spinach, broad beans, asparagus, sugarsnap peas, lentils, and added some walnuts, oats, sunflower seeds and olive oil. I don't know if it was nutritionally complete, as I'm not on chronometer (I'm on MFP, and I'm thinking about making the move but I'm worried about whether cronometer will have everything I need in its database), but I was literally just shooting for "can I steam a bunch of veg I have in the fridge / freezer to get me up to my calorie budget for dinner". And it was genuinely really really nice. I may have odd tastes though 😀

Edited by elatedsquirrel

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5 hours ago, elatedsquirrel said:

The only thing is I'm not sure if you can get collard greens in the UK

You can substitute with chicory, swiss chard, or some other green-d vegetables. Spring greens should be just about the same. Frozen is of course time-sparing.

 

5 hours ago, elatedsquirrel said:

The only downside is a lot of opened barely eaten cans of beans

You can open a can of the 4 varieties of legumes listed, eat 200 grams in a day until you're over with that can, then switch to the next legume-item in the list and so on.

Alternatively, you can keep two cans open and eat 100 grams of a kind and 100 grams of the other kind in a day until the two cans are over and you switch to the other two items.

The amounts can be construed as averages across longer timespans than one day. 

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On 8/2/2020 at 1:23 PM, mccoy said:

pretty stoic diet. Little left to taste pleasure.

I was reading Stephan Guyenet recently, and he seems to reckon that high palatability is a big part of the obesity epidemic. So "little taste left to pleasure" could be an advantage!

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3 hours ago, elatedsquirrel said:

I was reading Stephan Guyenet recently, and he seems to reckon that high palatability is a big part of the obesity epidemic. So "little taste left to pleasure" could be an advantage!

For those who wish to lose weight, undoubtedly so. I too read his book 'the hungry brain' on the neurological aspects of hunger and nutrition.

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