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InquilineKea

Reversal of Epigenetic Age with Diet and Lifestyle in a Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

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https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.07.20148098v1.full.pdf

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A metaanalysis of 2 trials in Norway similarly reported that 800 mcg folic acid plus 400 mg vitamin B12 daily was associated with increased cancer outcomes and all-cause mortality

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The DNAmAge clock is computed from some sites that increase and others that decrease methylation with age, so a net methylation increase would not necessarily be beneficial. Since this study targeted a healthy methylation pattern, not limited to increased methylation, the prescribed diet was rich in TET demethylase-associated nutrients (Hore, 2017) and specific plant polyphenols known to selectively regulate DNMT activity in addition to food-sourced methyl donors. It may be that these compounds assist in elevating methylation substrate and cofactor support from a risky ‘blunt instrument’ to ‘precision surgery’ on the DNA methylome by regulating where methyl groups are applied and removed.

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Hore, T. A. (2017). Modulating epigenetic memory through vitamins and TET: implications for regenerative medicine and cancer treatment. Epigenomics, 9(6), 863-871

800 mcg folic acid is only 200% of the RDA too...

Edited by InquilineKea

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This is interesting even though B vitamin supplementation is thought to decrease brain shrinkage (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772032/ ).

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The study followed 168 volunteers aged 70 or over with mild memory problems, half of whom took high dose B vitamin tablets for two years and the other half a placebo tablet. The researchers assessed disease progression in this group by using MRI scans to measure the brain atrophy rate over a two-year period. The findings are published in the journal PLoS ONE.

The team found that on average the brains of those taking the folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12 treatment shrank at a rate of 0.76% a year, while those in the placebo group had a mean brain shrinkage rate of 1.08%. People with the highest levels of homocysteine benefited most, showing atrophy rates on treatment that were half of those on placebo.

 

Obvs. these are both compatible (Alzheimer's and cancer are ANTI-correlated with each other). But it seems better to just supplement with betaine or trimethylglycine rather than folic acid. THOUGH maybe betaine is involved in 'blunt instrument' DNA methylation too

This means I suppose I should just toss my B supplements (though I keep my B12)

Edited by InquilineKea

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7 hours ago, InquilineKea said:

This is interesting even though B vitamin supplementation is thought to decrease brain shrinkage (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772032/ ).

Obvs. these are both compatible (Alzheimer's and cancer are ANTI-correlated with each other). But it seems better to just supplement with betaine or trimethylglycine rather than folic acid. THOUGH maybe betaine is involved in 'blunt instrument' DNA methylation too

This means I suppose I should just toss my B supplements (though I keep my B12)

Depends it seems based on what you cite and what you are most concerned with. IAC, It is always best to get nutrients within ones diet.

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On 8/9/2020 at 12:10 AM, InquilineKea said:

A metaanalysis of 2 trials in Norway similarly reported that 800 mcg folic acid

Folic acid can be harmful, indeed.  But it is different than the folate you get from food, which is beneficial even in high doses, based on my research.  It's easy to get folate from stuff okra or non-fortified nutritional yeast.

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