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Ron Put

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On 6/19/2021 at 8:52 PM, Ron Put said:

Here is a talk about protein and cancer and CVD:
 



I didn't realize he is almost 90.

Which explains why Bill Clinton is on a Dean Ornish vegan diet. His former cardiologist who prescribed statins told Clinton years ago that statins were not working because of his Genes. Someone referred him to Ornish and Esseltyne and they told him that basically his cardiologist was FOS!! His heart disease was reversed!

 

Edited by Mike41

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17 hours ago, Ron Put said:

Another reason to avoid meat, Sialic Acid:
 

 

Thanks for the interesting video...there is much to doubt, however, as the studies they draw on don't control for whether meat consumers ate processed/junk food... I mean that is most of the equation at play. 

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2 hours ago, alexthegra8 said:

as the studies they draw on don't control for whether meat consumers ate processed/junk food... I mean that is most of the equation at play. 

A valid point, but it appears that they specifically refer to red meat and dairy, not necessarily to processed meats.

I find the mechanism described pretty convincing overall:

"N-Glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is a widely expressed sialic acid in mammalian cells. Although humans are genetically deficient in producing Neu5Gc, small amounts are present in human cells in vivo. A dietary origin was suggested by human volunteer studies and by observing that free Neu5Gc is metabolically incorporated into cultured human carcinoma cells by unknown mechanisms. We now show that free Neu5Gc uptake also occurs in other human and mammalian cells. Inhibitors of certain non-clathrin-mediated endocytic pathways reduce Neu5Gc accumulation.... This mechanism can also explain the metabolic incorporation of chemically synthesized unnatural sialic acids, as reported by others."

I also find the proposition that it has deleterious effects confining:

"We found that high-Neu5Gc diet, gender, and age affect the specificity, levels, and repertoires of anti-Neu5Gc IgG immune responses, but not their affinity. Men consumed more Neu5Gc than women, mostly from red meat (p = 0.0015), and exhibited higher overall serum anti-Neu5Gc IgG levels by ELISA (3.94 ng/μl versus 2.22 ng/μl, respectively; p = 0.039). Detailed glycan microarray analysis against 56 different glycans revealed high Neu5Gc-specificity with increased anti-Neu5Gc IgG and altered repertoires, associated with higher consumption of Neu5Gc from red meat and cow dairy. Affinity purification of serum anti-Neu5Gc antibodies revealed increased levels and biased array repertoire patterns, without an increase in antibody affinity, in individuals consuming higher Neu5Gc levels. Furthermore, in a high-meat diet, antibody diversity patterns on glycan microarrays shifted towards Neu5Gcα3-linked glycans, increasing the α3/α6-glycans ratio score."
 

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Cold watermelon in the summer is sure an exquisite meal, but it's high in glucose and sucrose. Is 14 grams of fastly absorbed sugars  (glucose and sucrose) in 500 grams of fruit too much or OK? I'm leaving fructose aside. I'd say it's good for the glucose-tolerant ones. Perhaps not so good for the other ones.

image.png.cb60f5bbb72de6818b4d24ff3b7fa2f9.png

Edited by mccoy

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Watermelon:

NutritionData's Opinion
Weight loss: 4.9 stars  
 
Optimum health: 5 stars  
 
Weight gain: 4.1 stars
 
 

The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C.

The bad: A large portion of the calories in this food come from sugars.

 
 
Carrots:
NutritionData's Opinion
Weight loss: 4.75 stars
 
 
Optimum health: 4 stars  
 
Weight gain: 2 stars
 
 

The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Niacin, Vtamin B6, Folate and Manganese, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Potassium.

The bad: A large portion of the calories in this food come from sugars.

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On 2/19/2022 at 2:28 PM, mccoy said:

Cold watermelon in the summer is sure an exquisite meal, but it's high in glucose and sucrose. Is 14 grams of fastly absorbed sugars  (glucose and sucrose) in 500 grams of fruit too much or OK? I'm leaving fructose aside. I'd say it's good for the glucose-tolerant ones. Perhaps not so good for the other ones.

image.png.cb60f5bbb72de6818b4d24ff3b7fa2f9.png

First, watermelon historically has been a highly seasonal fruit (as many others); it serves a very good purpose as it has among the highest potassium content of any food. In the hot summer months, people sweat more, and it is almost by nature that watermelon is packed w/ so much potassium and fluid.

Second, watermelon boosts nitric oxide in the blood extremely well, which is why some bodybuilders eat it before going to the gym.

In conjunction, I think that daily consumption would not be smart, but it can surely be a part of a CR eating regimen, watermlon is very low cal, packed w/ nutrients, and naturally cleans out our arteries.

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Well, watermelon may not be all that unhealthy, at least for rats.

But if you are on a high-fat diet, there is a reasonable chance that you might be moving into the insulin resistance territory, and any carbs intake (even if whole) will spike your glucose more than usual. It becomes a vicious circle.

Antioxidative and antidiabetic activities of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) juice on oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic male Wistar albino rats

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On 2/18/2022 at 9:14 AM, Ron Put said:

Another reason to avoid meat, Sialic Acid:

Sialic acids have many known beneficial roles in human health.  The concern expressed here is for a specific sialic acid Neu5Gc which is not natively produced in humans and can provoke an antibody response.  This doesn't strike me as particularly concerning.  I've had food sensitivity testing looking at antibodies (IgG) to many foods.  The idea being antibodies are not a definitive sign of trouble but one should look first at foods provoking a strong antibody response. But to know what foods are problematic one must test the foods through elimination and reintroduction looking for reaction symptoms.  In my case the sensitivity testing was largely worthless.  The food to which I had the highest antibody response is cranberries.  I don't eat them most of the year so the elimination thing is automatic.  But I can eat a lot of them in November and December.  And nothing.  If cranberries are doing something bad to me it is so subtle I can not detect it at all.  I also had high antibodies to nightshades such as peppers, tomatoes and eggplant all of which I regularly consume with zero trouble.  I had very low levels of antibodies to the foods which give me the worst symptoms such as legumes although that might be because I stopped eating them long before doing the sensitivity testing.  As for meat, elimination and challenge testing only produces signs of benefit with high meat consumption.  There might be some correlation of meat consumption to my slowly rising LDL but it has barely tripled since giving up vegetarianism and all my other labs look great.

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8 hours ago, Ron Put said:

Well, watermelon may not be all that unhealthy, at least for rats.

But if you are on a high-fat diet, there is a reasonable chance that you might be moving into the insulin resistance territory, and any carbs intake (even if whole) will spike your glucose more than usual. It becomes a vicious circle.

Antioxidative and antidiabetic activities of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) juice on oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic male Wistar albino rats

Which lends support to people who claim that rat/mice studies should not be considered at all for human longevity advice...When would rats ever eat watermelon in their evolutionary nature? Of course giving rats watermelon probably would not improve their metabolic characteristics...

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This is an interesting interview discussing, among other things, modulating cancer drug treatments to harness evolutionary pressures against treatment-resistant cancer cells.

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