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KHashmi317

CR and dental health

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Tooth deterioration is slow and needs longitudinal studies. Including dental records and x-rays.

Asymptomatic (or mildly symptomatic) abscesses can  "run in the background" undetected , for years, taxing the immune system subtly, but harmfully affecting tissues and organs. 

Un-careful CR can affect bone and skeletal health in negative ways.

All that said, I am wondering whether CR academia (journals, etc.) have either directly or cursorily looked into the dental health of their CR'd animals? Papers, etc. E.g., how are Wisconsin Rhesuses doing?

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I had just come across a somewhat applicable study, while researching probiotic toothpaste.

Diet-borne systemic inflammation is associated with prevalent tooth loss

This is a study that reviews pro-inflammatory diet (however they define it), based on a questionnaire, so take it for what it is. But my reasoning is that CR, as long as it provides adequate nutrition, reduces inflammation, which should reduce dental issues.

I am aware that there are studies that indicate bone loss in obese people who do not engage in physical exercise, but these are not too likely to be applicable to what most who frequent this forum practice.

Has anyone here noticed an increase in dental problems since reducing calories? I for one feel that my gums at least are a bit healthier, and my DEXA scans do not indicate bone loss.

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Off-list I was asked about fruit consumption....

Been fruit-free for well over a dozen years. Partially because of the double whammy WRT dental health: acid and sugar. 

But MOSTLY because the raw veggies that make up so much of my diet -- software number-crunched from the very beginning of my CR practices -- more than covers the USDA RDA.

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On 6/19/2021 at 7:26 PM, KHashmi317 said:

Off-list I was asked about fruit consumption....

I had a very negative effect from fruit, especially the more acid types, and fruit juice, of which I was an avid consumer when younger. They definitely tend to erode the tooth enamel especially in more susceptible individuals. At 24, I could no more chew acid fruit and if I did that I could no more chew any hard food without pain. It took a while to recover and only more recently anti-sensitivity products came on the market.

My advise, reiterating what has already been said in this forum:

  • Avoid fruit juice and soda like hell, and if you have to drink them, use a straw deep in the mouth so that there is minimal interaction with teeth enamel
  • Avoid very acid foods like kimchi, lemon, vinegar and similar
  • after eating fruit and acid food wash your mouth with water and sodium bicarbonate, or lots of water in lieu of it. Then after a little use a toothbrush.
  • Use the kinds of toothpaste for sensitive teeth.
  • once or twice a year have your dentist apply special desensitizing products. It worked for me and now I can chew moderately acid fruit and hard food without many problems.

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Along with brushing with good fluoride toothpaste and ACT rinse. I also use Trident sugarless gum after most meals after I have cleared teeth and in-between spaces using various ad hoc tools: picks, floss-picks and brush-picks....

 

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Edited by KHashmi317

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Yes, brush picks are very important but they must be the exact type and size for every personal requirements, and you are reminding me to go and buy the right ones that I have no more in stock...

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