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Are There Foods That Can Increase NAD? (Part II)


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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-3GmgWO03k

 

Papers referenced in the video:
Therapeutic Potential of NAD-Boosting Molecules: The In Vivo Evidence: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29514...
NAD and the aging process: Role in life, death and everything in between: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27825...
Flavonoids as inhibitors of human CD38: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21641...
Flavonoid apigenin is an inhibitor of the NAD+ ase CD38: implications for cellular NAD+ metabolism, protein acetylation, and treatment of metabolic syndrome: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23172...
Characterization of Anthocyanins and Proanthocyanidins in Some Cultivars of Ribes, Aronia, and Sambucus and Their Antioxidant Capacity: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15612...
Flavonoid glycosides and antioxidant capacity of various blackberry, blueberry and red grape genotypes determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...
USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content of Selected Foods: https://www.ars.usda.gov/arsuserfiles...
Large changes in NAD levels associated with CD38 expression during HL-60 cell differentiation: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24216...
Effect of genotype and environment on flavonoid concentration and profile of black sorghum grains (incorrectly indicated as Dykes et al. 2013): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science...
Luteolinidin Protects the Post-ischemic Heart through CD38 Inhibition with Preservation of NAD(P)(H): https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/conten...
 
 
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IMO, you waist time looking for a magic pill.  A good, well-balanced Calorie Restricted diet (cronometer can be useful), and frequent cardio exercise that uses most of your skeletal musckes (e.g., elliptical with hand motion) will work; snake-oil pills won't -- and may hurt you.

  --  Saul

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Hi Mike!

I suspect that you've seen one of Sinclair's videos on the subject.  He gave a talk in which he promoted the stuff here at the University of Rochester a few years ago, during our annual anti-aging conference, which is held in the Biology Department at the end of the academic year.  Prior to that, Sinclair promoted Resveratrol, which he sold -- I think he'll sell you NAD+ pills or NMN now.

IMO, you're best off eating a wide variety of raw vegetables for your daily meal(s).  There's all the goodies that  we know about that we get from veggies; and those many that we don't know about.

And, of course, exercise.

Best of luck,

  --  Saul

 

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Eat real food and exercise isn't specific enough. That approach was great for people like Jack LaLanne, who lived to 95y, but it's not good enough for me. There are foods that contain CD38 inhibitors (which degrades NAD+), so including foods that contain those substances may be a good strategy for fighting the age-related decline for NAD+.

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1 hour ago, Mike Lustgarten said:

At no point did I recommend supplements, and it's even in the title, "Are there foods..."

Ok fair enough! Your really trying to tailor a diet. Fine, but again it’s tricky. Whole, plant foods, mostly vegetables is where the evidence is strongest. Anytime you get too specific it can lead to problems. Variety of the right mix of foods is What our bodies do best on. Too much of this or that ca uses imbalances.

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8 hours ago, Mike Lustgarten said:

even in the title, "Are there foods..."

True,  but you are chasing down single isolated phytochemicals such as  luteolin,  agigenin etc. and trying to maximize their intake with the aim of optimizing single isolated biomarkers.    A biohacking mentality, basically.    I understand the allure  of that,  believe me, but  I'm not sure that's a demonstrably better approach than what Mike41 advocates. In any case it's entirely experimental.  And not without risk.

I do appreciate Mike L's videos--  they are very informative and well-done.

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In fairness, virtually all who visit here tailor their diets, to one extent or another. Some are vegan, some don't eat grains, some try to limit protein and some don't, some swear by olive oil and others think it's an unhealthy marketing scam. I have missed many of the other nuances, but you get the point.

Mike's individual videos do focus on single items, but in the aggregate add perspective by summarizing various research and attempting to correlate with observations of his own periodic blood panels. One can agree or disagree with the methodology, or with the basic premise for each video of course.

In this specific case, I would not take NAD, but some of the effects of the discussed foods were new to me. I already eat both fresh and dried parsley, and I actually have recently started adding black sorghum bran to my daily flax and oatmeal mix, with black barriers, blueberries, raspberries, and plenty of strawberries. I quite like it, and according to Mike's video, my NAD should be boosted (I don't believe that there is a reliable and widely available test by a major provider like Labcorp, but I will check).

Anyway, the point is, most of us here are tweakers regarding diet, as well as exercise, cold exposure (I didn't even know that "cold vests" existed before I joined), saunas, even stuff like whole-body vibration, and other stranger things. I am always glad to have more information, whether I use it or not.

 

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25 minutes ago, Ron Put said:

.... cold exposure (I didn't even know that "cold vests" existed before I joined), saunas,

Speaking of cold exposure and saunas...

PMID: 33414897
Quote

Abstract

In this review, we describe the role of oxidized forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a molecule central to health benefits as the result from observing selected healthy lifestyle recommendations. Namely, NAD+ level can be regulated by lifestyle and nutrition approaches such as fasting, caloric restriction, sports activity, low glucose availability, and heat shocks. NAD+ is reduced with age at a cellular, tissue, and organismal level due to inflammation, defect in NAMPT-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, and the PARP-mediated NAD+ depletion. This leads to a decrease in cellular energy production and DNA repair and modifies genomic signalling leading to an increased incidence of chronic diseases and ageing.

By implementing healthy lifestyle approaches, endogenous intracellular NAD+ levels can be increased, which explains the molecular mechanisms underlying health benefits at the organismal level. Namely, adherence to here presented healthy lifestyle approaches is correlated with an extended life expectancy free of major chronic diseases.

 

Quote

6. Environmental Stress: Heat/Cold Shock and NAD+ Levels

Exposure to the elevated heat for short time periods can result in beneficial health effects. Cardiovascular responses to long-term adaptations in response to heat stress result in reduced blood pressure and arterial stiffness and improved endothelial and microvascular function [141]. For example, regular sauna bathing may be linked to several health benefits, which include decreased risk of sudden cardiac death and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality [142], reduction in the risk of neurocognitive diseases and nonvascular conditions such as pulmonary diseases, and amelioration of conditions such as arthritis, headache, and flu [143].

What is more, heat stress cardioprotection and improved postischemic functional recovery in the heat-stressed hearts after cardioplegic arrest due to increased NAD+ and NADP+ concentrations were observed [144]. Heat shock triggers an increase in the NAD+/NADH ratio as a result of decreased NADH levels and an increase in recruitment of SIRT1 to the hsp70 promoter [25]. Enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), which catalyzes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis, is elevated during conditions of heat shock and transcriptionally regulated by the heat shock factor (HSF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) in vivo [145, 146].

In addition to heat stress, also cold stress-induced physiological responses and activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) have health benefits [147]. BAT mainly burns energy in contrast to white adipose tissue (WAT), which stores fat [141]. In mouse and human BAT, cold exposure activates NAD+ biosynthesis mediated by a rate-limiting enzyme, NAMPT [148]. BAT is abundant in mitochondria and plays a role in energy expenditure related to producing heat by an energy-dissipating process of nonshivering thermogenesis, leading to changes in lipid metabolism [149] and other health benefits like the absence of low-grade inflammation, increased insulin sensitivity, and decreased liver fat [150, 151]. Degradation, whitening, and impaired function of BAT promotes obesity [152155].

The facts supporting the “NAD+ > SIRTs > positive effect” pathway as the mechanism of action for the beneficial effects of NAD+ repletion strategies have been presented so far. Are there indications of concerns about increasing the levels of NAD+?  (ETC.)

 

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While I can see how I'm talking about the effect of isolated nutrients (flavonoids) on a given biomarker (NAD+), I've always promoted whole foods as a means to include these substances in the diet, with the exception of targeted supplementation (i.e. Vitamin D in the winter). Also, I'm not saying to only eat these foods, but rather to make the viewer aware that these substances exist, which can help craft their inclusion into the diet (or not). I'm also not saying that NAD+ is the whole story of aging, only a part. As Ron said, we're all tweakers, trying to get the most bang for our buck for slowing aging through various interventions, whether they're CR, eating lots of veggies, cold-showers, etc.

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Bioavailability of Quercetin (full text available)

Quote

Abstract:

Quercetin is generally present as quercetin glycoside in nature and involves quercetin aglycone conjugated to sugar moieties such as glucose or rutinose. Quercetin has been reported to exhibit antioxidative, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-aggregatory and vasodilating effects. Unfortunately, quercetin bioavailability is generally poor and several factors affect its bioavailability.

Quercetin bioavailability varies widely between individuals. Gender may affect quercetin bioavailability, but there is no clear evidence. There has been little research looking for the effects of age and vitamin C status on bioavailability of quercetin supplements, but there is no research seeking out the effects of age and vitamin C status on bioavailability of food-derived quercetin.

Presence of sugar moieties increases bioavailability and differences in quercetin-conjugated glycosides affect bioavailability. For instance, onion-derived quercetin, which is mainly quercetin glucoside, is more bioavailable than apple-derived quercetin, which contains quercetin rhamnoside and quercetin galactoside.

Quercetin is lipophilic compound, thus dietary fat enhances its bioavailability. Nondigestible fiber may also improve quercetin bioavailability. Quercetin bioavailability is greater when it is consumed as an integral food component. This study reviews and discusses factors affecting quercetin bioavailability.

 

Bioavailability of Quercetin From Berries and the Diet (full text available)

 

Quote

Abstract

Berries are a rich source of various polyphenols, including the flavonoid quercetin. In this article, the results of three intervention studies investigating the bioavailability of quercetin from berries are reviewed. In the first study, we investigated the short-term kinetics of quercetin after consumption of black currant juice and showed that quercetin is rapidly absorbed from it. In the second study, we showed that plasma quercetin levels increase up to 50% in subjects consuming 100 g/day of bilberries, black currants, and lingonberries as a part of their normal diets for 2 mo. In the third study, healthy subjects consumed a diet high or low in vegetables, berries, and other fruit for 6 wk. Quercetin concentrations nearly doubled in the high-vegetable, -berry, and -other fruit group and decreased by 30% in subjects consuming less of these foods than normally. The results showed that plasma quercetin is bioavailable from a diet containing berries and indicate that it may be a good biomarker of fruit and vegetable intake in general.
 
Pickled capers are another excellent source of quercetin. Pickling promotes conversion of rutin to quercetin,  with a maximum reported concentration of 520 mg/100 g for canned capers, compared to a maximum of 323 mg/100 g quercetin for raw capers.  Sodium content can be an issue,  though.
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