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Fluoride (redux!!)


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I should post this topic in the CR and dental health thread I created a few mos ago ... more on that later ;)

Anyway, going back to old Mailing List days, Fluoride was an on-going topic of interest to heavily health-oriented folks ... like the CR group.

My own personal views and practices on fluoride have swung back in favor of its CAREFUL use for the sole purpose of dental health .... especially in lieu of potential link of dental health and late-life neuro-degenerative ailments:

nsc_20190202.jpg?width=187&alt=New%2BSci

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191842-gum-disease-may-be-the-cause-of-alzheimers-heres-how-to-avoid-it/

About fluoride ... its important to keep in mind that city water and toothpaste are minor players compared to food and drink stuff you may actually be swallowing ....

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-fluoride-foods-and-drinks.php

Edited by KHashmi317
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I don't feel strongly either way, based on what I know. I don't filter my water but use a probiotic non-fluoride paste (there is no fluoride version, anyway).

I get my teeth cleaned every 3-4 months and my dentist has been recommending using a decent water pick for flossing. I looked it up and bought one, as it appears to be effective at removing bacteria below the gum line, which flossing doesn't do as effectively.

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Inter-dental brushes work well to remove grit below the gum line -- I use them and an electric rotary tooth cleaning toll for brushing my teeth,  I do these two things twice daily, and don't floss.  Works well for me. (but I have large gaps between teeth -- if your teeth are very close (as is so for Dean), inter-dental brushes won't work well; then you need to floss.

  --  Saul

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35 minutes ago, Saul said:

Inter-dental brushes work well to remove grit below the gum line --

I had seen a study on that when I searched. Here it is (it's done by Waterpik, so take it for what it is):

Conclusions: The Waterpik Water Flosser and manual toothbrush removes significantly more plaque from tooth surfaces (whole mouth, marginal, approximal, facial, and lingual) than interdental brushes and a manual toothbrush after a single use.

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Maybe -- but I doubt it.  I remember going to my semi-annual dental cleaning -- and after she finished, feeling some junk between two molars that i could easily remove with my interdental brushes.  The cleaner got rid of it.

She retired less than s year later.

 --  Saul

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