Jump to content
Gordo

Just curious, anyone have a plan, or preps for global pandemic?

Covid-19 Vaccine Survey  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. Your Vaccine Status is:

    • Fully vaccinated
      13
    • Partially vaccinated
      0
    • Not Vaccinated
      3
  2. 2. If not (fully) vaccinated, your reason(s) for your decision (check all that apply):

    • Not Applicable - I'm vaccinated
      13
    • The rapid vaccine development process makes me distrust them
      1
    • I'm worried about vaccine side effects
      1
    • I don't think I'm at much risk of getting a covid infection
      2
    • I don't believe a covid infection is a serious risk for someone like me
      2
    • I'm waiting until the vaccines receive final approval
      0
    • Fear of needles
      0
    • A medical condition prevents me from getting vaccines
      0
    • Bad reaction to the first dose of the covid vaccine
      0
    • I already had COVID-19 and don't think I need the vaccine for protection
      1
    • Vaccine not available where I live
      0
  3. 3. Are you OK with having your CR forum name included on a list of members who have/haven't chosen to be vaccinated?

    • Yes
      14
    • No
      2


Recommended Posts

I don't understand how you can see one study claiming masks have no significant effect on transmission, and argue that that refutes the large body of counter evidence showing that masks do indeed reduce virus transmission. Efficacy of face mask in preventing respiratory virus transmission: A systematic review and meta-analysis

It doesn't take much critical thinking to understand that droplet transmission and inhalation is reduced by covering your mouth - that's not even a debatable topic, so why would it be a bad thing to require masks? And your claims that asymptomatic people are highly unlikely to spread the virus is also unfounded. Do you really believe that there is no droplet or aerosol spray from laughing and talking? Have you ever felt spit hit your face while having a simple conversation with someone? That's a pretty common occurrence. Do you realize that asymptomatic people are also normal humans, prone to sneezing and occasionally coughing, from allergies or photic reflex? 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, tea said:

I don't understand how you can see one study claiming masks have no significant effect on transmission, and argue that that refutes the large body of counter evidence showing that masks do indeed reduce virus transmission. Efficacy of face mask in preventing respiratory virus transmission: A systematic review and meta-analysis

It doesn't take much critical thinking to understand that droplet transmission and inhalation is reduced by covering your mouth - that's not even a debatable topic, so why would it be a bad thing to require masks? And your claims that asymptomatic people are highly unlikely to spread the virus is also unfounded.

Speaking of "critical thinking...".  Are you suggesting that WHO, the CDC and every major medical organization were all in the Dark Ages before the popular media and the Democrats, aided by a handful of laughable "studies" made them modify their public stance?

Did you read any of the studies?  Do you understand how viruses are transmitted, or that "asymptomatic" means someone who is not secreting and spraying fluids, by definition?  It doesn't sound like it.  It is very much a "debatable topic" and only someone ignorant of the evidence would claim that it is not.

 

Edited by Ron Put

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Ron Put said:

"asymptomatic" means someone who is not secreting and spraying fluids, by definition?

You seem to only pay attention to information that supports what you wish to think, Ron.  I recall the study that examined the droplets coming from a person's mouth while in conversation.  The word "healthy" induced a spray visible by special techniques, even observing that the "th" was the worst part of the word.  When pronouncing "th", it is almost like flicking your tongue out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, AlPater said:

You seem to only pay attention to information that supports what you wish to think, Ron.  I recall the study that examined the droplets coming from a person's mouth while in conversation.  The word "healthy" induced a spray visible by special techniques, even observing that the "th" was the worst part of the word.  When pronouncing "th", it is almost like flicking your tongue out.

Al, the study you are referring to has a guy in a lab room, shouting through a cardboard box directing the flow of droplets.  No, I really do not think that this is good science.

Again, it has been well established that there is no real evidence for mask-wearing by healthy people in open areas to prevent viral infections, which is why no reputable medical body has ever recommended that the public wears masks.

I am not making stuff up, I am quoting statements from numerous experts like Fauci, and referring to the positions of WHO and the CDC.  What exactly changed over the last three months, other than vicious attacks from the media and Democratic political figures on both WHO and the CDC, all citing a handful of anointed "experts" (often the same who predicted millions of dead) and studies like the one you are referring to.

And if masks worn on the street by healthy people were so effective, California and New York would be Covid-19-free, while Iowa would be a cemetery....

P.S. I should add that my argument is not with legitimate evidence and discussion, but with the trend which emerged earlier this year and politicized and weaponized the virus, and shut down any reasoned debate on public policy, with claims by the media, political hacks and rabid social media throngs that these things "are not debatable." 

The dangerous woke calls for the banning of "hate speech" (however one defines it) morphed into "canceling" and ruining the career of anyone who challenged the often nonsensical claims why the Western democracies should lock down, while doing enormous damage to our economies and to our increasingly divided societies.  This is what I am really arguing against.

Edited by Ron Put

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron wrote:  "asymptomatic" means someone who is not secreting and spraying fluids, by definition?

I don't know where you got this "definition", but my understanding is more along the lines of what Wikipedia says:

"In medicine, a disease is considered asymptomatic if a patient is a carrier for a disease or infection but experiences no symptoms. A condition might be asymptomatic if it fails to show the noticeable symptoms with which it is usually associated."

"Knowing that a condition is asymptomatic is important because:"

     " ...    It may be contagious.   ..."

 

Edited by Todd S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Ron Put said:

... nonsensical claims why the Western democracies should lock down, while doing enormous damage to our economies and to our increasingly divided societies

 

Well,  it looks like you got a big treat coming up  😈:

Trump 'failure' on COVID-19 will be central message of Biden convention

 
Quote
[...]“The COVID story allows Joe Biden to say everything he needs to about Donald Trump in one tight narrative,” said Democratic strategist Christy Setzer. “There's even a stunning visual contrast — masked and safety-first Dems versus unmasked and reckless GOPers.”
Quote

[...]In June, Biden gave a preview of what his convention speech might look like.  

The president talks about, you know, manhood and, you know, and being strong and you don’t need the mask,” Biden said.

“I think we have to start appealing to the better side of human nature by pointing out that that mask is not so much to protect me. It’s to protect other people.”

“And it's called patriotism,” he said. “It's called responsibility.”

 

Kamala Harris,  well-practiced in  art of prosecutorial oratory,  just gave us this brilliant example of what is to come:

Quote

During her first public appearance as presumptive Democratic vice presidential nominee on Wednesday, the senator from California compared the novel coronavirus, which has infected over 5.1 million and is linked to 165,000 deaths in the United States, to the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

[...]"It didn't have to be this way.

Six years ago, in fact, we had a different health crisis. It was called Ebola. And we all remember that pandemic.

But you know what happened then? Barack Obama and Joe Biden did their job. Only two people in the United States died. Two. That is what is called leadership," Harris said.

 

 

Edited by Sibiriak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dare I add more fuel to the lockdown discussion?  I saw this article from a fact check review of a Newsweek article.  Sweden’s COVID-19 mortality is higher than in most European countries; no evidence whether or how the absence of lockdown impacted this outcome

Summarizing paragraph

In summary, the Newsweek article reports accurate numbers but they are cherry-picked to suggest that Sweden is less affected by the COVID-19 epidemic than other countries in Europe. The article excluded all countries from its comparison with a lower CFR than Sweden even though it claims to have conducted comparisons between Sweden and the rest of Europe. This is misleading the reader into concluding that lockdowns are ineffective. In addition, mortality rates in different countries can not be compared directly because they ignore differences in multiple variables, such as cultural background, which can significantly alter the impact or necessity of a lockdown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since this discussion has at times veered into the politics, I think it is important to distinguish between what the deniers say and what they do.

11 words from John Oliver that expose Fox News' fundamental hypocrisy

 

But there was one thing -- actually one sentence of 11 words -- that really stood out to me in the Oliver segment. And it was this, when he was talking about Fox News' coronavirus coverage:

"They only pretend to believe these things on television for money."

The point Oliver was making was that even as many Fox News anchors were pushing the idea that coronavirus was less virulent than the flu and that it was the product of a hyper-partisan media trying to "get" Trump, the company was warning its employees to stay at home and "reducing the staff footprint at our headquarters in New York."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Navigating into fully political territory now, interesting though.

3 documents related to the lockdown in Italy have been recently declassified. IT turns out that the scientific committee recommended the lockdown of only 3 regions in northern Italy, whereas the populist-leftist government decided to lockdown all of Italy. The annoying thing that I remember well is that the government was repeating that they were following the advice of the experts.

So, as it's happening in many other parts of the world, we've been lied to. 

Have Americans been lied to by WHO and Fauci or have they been lied to by the leftist factions and WHO and Fauci were telling the truth? It's not even that much clear who's lying and the degree and multiplicity of the lies.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/16/2020 at 11:46 AM, Gordo said:

Sounds intriguing, but you have to wonder, what is the potential harm from inhaling these things, we might not find out about the downsides right away, and how often would they need to be inhaled?  I like that other approaches are being explored though.

Saul - that's great that you have already gotten 1/2 vaccine.  Keep us updated.  It will also be interesting to find out if the antibody response to the vaccine is weaker in older people, I'm sure Pfizer is looking at that.  I did not receive any response to the vaccine trials I volunteered for. 

FYI: My son did take the covid-19 antibody test and it came back NEGATIVE.  I was almost certain he had covid, and maybe he did but just didn't generate antibodies, or maybe the test isn't accurate, but for now I guess I go by the assumption he had something else - I was really surprised because he was so sick and for so long (2 weeks) with high fever and all... 

 

Hi Gordo!

I've volunteered for a lot of trials of vaccines for various conditions -- including RCSD, Norovirus, and others.  I've always had a good response. The evidence is that I have a vigorous immune system.

Strict CR and vigorous exercise are a good way to maintain youthful vigor, whatever one's chronological age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/24/2020 at 10:49 AM, Gordo said:

[TomBAvoider]They have a real chance to sprint into leadership when all the rest of the world's economies lie in devastation.

Pure fantasy once again.  By the way, did you know China now has over 100 million people back in lockdownsTheir economy has imploded.

Fast-forward:

https://twitter.com/i/status/1295345558270488577

China’s rail shipments to Europe set records as demand surges for Chinese goods amid coronavirus

China’s economy rebounds from COVID-19, growing 3.2% in the second quarter (July 16)

Chinese markets could see further upside, strategist says (Aug 18)

Could be a lot worse...

Edited by Sibiriak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Efficacy of various treatment modalities for nCOV-2019: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Misra S, Nath M, Hadda V, Vibha D.
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Aug 18:e13383. doi: 10.1111/eci.13383. Online ahead of print.
PMID: 32810285 Review.
Abstract
Background: Several therapeutic agents have been investigated for treatment of novel Coronavirus-2019 (nCOV-2019). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of various treatment modalities in nCOV-2019 patients.
Methods: A literature search was conducted before 29 June 2020 in PubMed, Google Scholar, Cochrane library databases. A fixed-effect model was applied if I2 <50%, else results were combined using random-effect model. Risk Ratio (RR) or Standardized Mean Difference (SMD) along-with 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) were used to pool the results. Between-study heterogeneity was explored using influence and sensitivity analyses and publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. Entire statistical analysis was conducted in R version 3.6.2.
Results: Fifty studies involving 15 in-vitro and 35 clinical studies including 9170 nCOV-2019 patients were included. Lopinavir-Ritonavir was significantly associated with shorter mean time to clinical recovery (SMD -0.32; 95%CI -0.57 to -0.06), Remdesivir was significantly associated with better overall clinical recovery (RR 1.17; 95%CI 1.07 to 1.29) and Tocilizumab was associated with less all-cause mortality (RR 0.38; 95%CI 0.16 to 0.93). Hydroxychloroquine was associated with longer time to clinical recovery and less overall clinical recovery. It additionally had higher all-cause mortality and more total adverse events.
Conclusion: Our meta-analysis suggests that except in vitro studies, no treatment has shown overall favorable outcomes in nCOV-2019 patients. Lopinavir-Ritonavir, Remdesivir and Tocilizumab may have some benefits while Hydroxychloroquine administration may cause harm in nCOV-2019 patients. Results from upcoming large clinical trials may further clarify role of these drugs.
Keywords: Humans; Interventions; Novel Coronavirus-2019; Treatments; nCOV-2019.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pfizer and BioNTech’s favored Covid-19 vaccine has fewer side effects than their first

 

Pfizer and BioNTech surprised many industry watchers on July 27 when they announced they would conduct a large-scale study of a vaccine for Covid-19. The surprise? The vaccine that would be tested in a 30,000-patient trial wasn’t the one for which the companies had presented data on July 1.

The reason, the companies said, was that a second vaccine seemed to generate a similar immune response, but fewer side effects. On Thursday, they posted the resultsfrom all 332 people who received either vaccine, referred to as vaccines B1 or B2 — and indeed, B2 recipients experienced markedly fewer adverse events tied to the vaccine.

“Obviously, the better tolerated the vaccine, the more I think it will encourage public acceptance of a broad immunization,” said William Gruber, the senior vice president of vaccine clinical research and development at Pfizer. “Both would have been great candidates. We were fortunate that B2 actually satisfied having both a favorable immune profile and fewer reactions.”

The study tested doses of each vaccine ranging from 10 micrograms to 100 micrograms. The 30-microgram dose of B2 is being taken forward in clinical trials.

With the original vaccine, called BNT162b1, or B1 for short, patients between the ages of 18 and 55 had adverse events thought to be related to the vaccine 50% of the time at the 30-microgram dose. Those between the ages of 65 and 85 had related adverse events 16.7% of the time.

For the second vaccine, BNT162b2, or B2, patients between 18 and 55 had adverse events thought to be related to the vaccine 16.7% of the time, and no adverse effects thought to be related to the vaccine were reported in those between the ages of 65 and 85.

 

Both vaccines use mRNA — the genetic messenger the body uses to make the DNA code into proteins — packaged inside a fatty capsule, called a lipid nanoparticle, that allows it to get into cells. The mRNA instructs cells to make a protein, which then triggers the immune system into action. For the B1 vaccine, the mRNA coded for the part of a protein on the SARS-CoV-2 virus that binds to a receptor on human cells in order to gain entry to them. The B2 vaccine makes the entirety of this protein, known as the spike protein.

Using the full spike protein may allow the immune system to figure out more ways to detect and attack the virus. Chemical modifications to the mRNA may also explain some of the difference. Although the same dosage, by weight, was given to patients with each vaccine, the B2 vaccine would include fewer particles, because the full-length mRNA is heavier.

The side effects tracked were mostly those one would expect from a vaccine injection, including soreness at the injection site, fever, chills, headache, and muscle or joint pain. No older adult who received B2 reported redness or swelling at the injection site.

The average level of antibodies to the virus in older adults was only 41% that seen in younger participants. However, it was still higher than the level of antibodies seen in recovered patients, the authors said.

All patients in the study of B2 were white and non-Hispanic, with more older women than older men participating. The younger patients were a median of 37 years old, while the older ones were a median of 69.

Pfizer has said that some data from its large study of the B2 vaccine could come as early as October.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of articles at MedicalXpress.

The first examines why the US was the first country to exceed 5 million cases.  It does note the different response to this virus versus earlier challenges such as Ebola.

The second mentions the Wednesday’s White House restrictions on the FDA regulating lab tests which it claims could get innovative tests to the market quicker.  I guess they think companies like Theranos are ancient history and would never happen again.  I believe it’s actions like this that have virtually destroyed trust in the current US environment.

 

Gaps in early surveillance of coronavirus led to record-breaking US trajectory

Research from the University of Notre Dame estimates that more than 100,000 people were already infected with COVID-19 by early March—when only 1,514 cases and 39 deaths had been officially reported 

"We weren't testing enough," said Alex Perkins, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, an expert in infectious disease epidemiology and population biology and the lead of the study. "The number of unobserved infections appears to be due to very low rates of case detection during a critical time, when the epidemic was really starting to take hold in this country. Part of it was the availability of testing, but another huge part was case definitions and the fact that they were overly restrictive early on."

"It was such a crucial period [January to March] in terms of how this situation started," said Perkins. "We look at the United States now and compare it to other countries like South Korea or Germany, New Zealand or Vietnam, any number of countries who have done a much, much better job controlling transmission. The key differences really come down to the time period we examine in this study. Those countries had adequate surveillance up and running at that time, whereas we show that throughout most of February the United States missed the vast majority of infections that were already out there. This particular timeframe that we focus on is really important for figuring out how we got here in the first place."

"I think the fact that there were so many infections by the second half of February speaks to the importance of and what we could have done in terms of containment," said Perkins. "If you think about Ebola or SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) or other emerging infectious diseases, there have been cases that show up in the U.S. or other countries where officials move quickly to get ahead of them. They isolate those people, they do contact tracing—and transmission is extinguished. I think a lot of us were hoping that would be the situation with this disease. By the time we got to February, the problem had grown so big, containing the virus wasn't possible."

 

White House blocks FDA's power to regulate lab tests

The Trump administration has blocked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from regulating a wide swath of laboratory tests, including ones for the coronavirus.

The new policy, which was posted Wednesday and is strongly opposed by the FDA itself, stunned health experts and laboratories

The change could result in unreliable coronavirus tests getting on the market, potentially worsening the testing crisis in the United States

During the Obama administration, the FDA proposed tighter regulation during normal times, a move that drew intense opposition from labs and never happened. But during public health emergencies, the FDA has required test developers to seek an emergency use authorization that allows regulators to review the tests for accuracy

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/21/2020 at 9:03 AM, Gordo said:

Pfizer and BioNTech’s favored Covid-19 vaccine has fewer side effects than their first

 

Pfizer and BioNTech surprised many industry watchers on July 27 when they announced they would conduct a large-scale study of a vaccine for Covid-19. The surprise? The vaccine that would be tested in a 30,000-patient trial wasn’t the one for which the companies had presented data on July 1.

The reason, the companies said, was that a second vaccine seemed to generate a similar immune response, but fewer side effects. On Thursday, they posted the resultsfrom all 332 people who received either vaccine, referred to as vaccines B1 or B2 — and indeed, B2 recipients experienced markedly fewer adverse events tied to the vaccine.

“Obviously, the better tolerated the vaccine, the more I think it will encourage public acceptance of a broad immunization,” said William Gruber, the senior vice president of vaccine clinical research and development at Pfizer. “Both would have been great candidates. We were fortunate that B2 actually satisfied having both a favorable immune profile and fewer reactions.”

The study tested doses of each vaccine ranging from 10 micrograms to 100 micrograms. The 30-microgram dose of B2 is being taken forward in clinical trials.

With the original vaccine, called BNT162b1, or B1 for short, patients between the ages of 18 and 55 had adverse events thought to be related to the vaccine 50% of the time at the 30-microgram dose. Those between the ages of 65 and 85 had related adverse events 16.7% of the time.

For the second vaccine, BNT162b2, or B2, patients between 18 and 55 had adverse events thought to be related to the vaccine 16.7% of the time, and no adverse effects thought to be related to the vaccine were reported in those between the ages of 65 and 85.

 

Both vaccines use mRNA — the genetic messenger the body uses to make the DNA code into proteins — packaged inside a fatty capsule, called a lipid nanoparticle, that allows it to get into cells. The mRNA instructs cells to make a protein, which then triggers the immune system into action. For the B1 vaccine, the mRNA coded for the part of a protein on the SARS-CoV-2 virus that binds to a receptor on human cells in order to gain entry to them. The B2 vaccine makes the entirety of this protein, known as the spike protein.

Using the full spike protein may allow the immune system to figure out more ways to detect and attack the virus. Chemical modifications to the mRNA may also explain some of the difference. Although the same dosage, by weight, was given to patients with each vaccine, the B2 vaccine would include fewer particles, because the full-length mRNA is heavier.

The side effects tracked were mostly those one would expect from a vaccine injection, including soreness at the injection site, fever, chills, headache, and muscle or joint pain. No older adult who received B2 reported redness or swelling at the injection site.

The average level of antibodies to the virus in older adults was only 41% that seen in younger participants. However, it was still higher than the level of antibodies seen in recovered patients, the authors said.

All patients in the study of B2 were white and non-Hispanic, with more older women than older men participating. The younger patients were a median of 37 years old, while the older ones were a median of 69.

Pfizer has said that some data from its large study of the B2 vaccine could come as early as October.

 

 

On 8/21/2020 at 9:03 AM, Gordo said:

 

Hi Gordo!

 

In fact, the the second part of Phase 3 testing of the Pfizer vaccine, in which they are testing a large group of people age late teen to 85 has begun.

My wife Maxine is an NP working in the Gastroenterology Department of Rochester General Hospital.  She attended on line a Grand Round of the Hospital (on-lline -- it was at the height of the Covid panic here in Rochester -- I think March).  At that meeting, attendees were informed that RGH would be conducting Phase 3 trials of the Pfizer vaccine, and that interested persons should call a certain telephone number.

I called immediately, and presented my data.  They (eventually) enrolled me in the study.  They have been in the second part of Phase three -- they've chosen the preferred version of the vaccine, and people in this second part of phase 3 receive either saline or the vaccine (half in each category).  They began with younger participants -- they called me about 2 1/2 weeks ago, and I had my first shot.  The injection is made intermuscularly -- top of the left shoulder -- the same spot as the shingrix vaccine..

Afterwards, I felt extremely tired.  I thought "I am getting old".  I remained extremely tired all day, and the next day, I still felt tired, but less so

After working out on my elliptical, I felt fine.

Maxine noted that I probably got the vaccine.  (E.g., after every other injection that I've gotten, I never had that effect -- including with the both doses of the Shingrix vaccine, which is injected exactly the same way as at RGH.) 

I realized:  She was right!  I checked -- fatigue is the commonest side effect of the vaccine.

😊

I get the second dose on Tuesday, September 1 at 2PM at RGH.

  --  Saul

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hong Kong reports first coronavirus reinfection
First really well documented (including genomic sequencing) case of reinfection after months past initial infection.

I could see global leaders deciding at some point the only way to eradicate this virus will be to vaccinate everyone at the same time. That will be politically very difficult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Gordo said:

Hong Kong reports first coronavirus reinfection
First really well documented (including genomic sequencing) case of reinfection after months past initial infection.

I could see global leaders deciding at some point the only way to eradicate this virus will be to vaccinate everyone at the same time. That will be politically very difficult.

MMmmm, that news was broadcasted tonight by the media, bad news indeed, also vaccinate all humanity and perhaps all pets at the same time! Practically an impossibility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/22/2020 at 10:34 AM, Gordo said:

Already this is sounding a lot like Hydroxychloroquine

Ivermectin is still not a miracle cure for COVID-19, despite what you may have read

Both work very effectively against COVID. As a treatment and prophylactic.

Ivermectin better than HCQ.

But both have to be dosed properly and given as a cocktail (e.g., with Zinc, etc.).

Both are cheap and effective ... which is not media friendly nor does it help pharma $$. And, academia and mainstream journals follow the same $$ sources. Hey ....who can blame 'em ....  at the end of the day, the folks at CNN and Science and Nature have to put food on the table, too  😉

Edited by KHashmi317

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is hydroxychloroquine still being tested?

Hydroxychloroquine Shouldn’t Be Used at All for Covid, IDSA Says

Hospitals should drop using the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine altogether to treat Covid-19 patients, even if it’s in a clinical trial, according to new medical guidelines.

The Infectious Diseases Society of America revised its Covid-19 treatment guidelines Friday, toughening its stance against the use of the anti-malarial drug that’s been widely touted by President Donald Trump as a way to deal with the pandemic.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/24/2020 at 10:12 AM, Gordo said:

Hong Kong reports first coronavirus reinfection
First really well documented (including genomic sequencing) case of reinfection after months past initial infection.

I could see global leaders deciding at some point the only way to eradicate this virus will be to vaccinate everyone at the same time. That will be politically very difficult.

Hi Gordo!

Science News had a much more extensive report on this.  I'm too lazy to pull it up.  BUT, here's the basic details:  The infectious disease people say this is no surprise.

In the widely reported Hong Kong reinfection:

The person reinfected showed no symptoms; he simply had been tested for virus, and it came back positive.  The ID people say: This is normal for flu and many other infections.  A person in the same state as the Hong Kong person during his "second infection" is probably unable to infect others.

So:  No, Gordo:  You don't have to vaccinate everyone simultaneously to establish herd immunity.

  --  Saul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×