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Is 15.5 Bmi too Dangerous ?


Deniz
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Hi Everyone,

My height is 162cm and my weight is 47kg. I feel great. But 3 years later, I need to drop 40.6kg or under 41kg(15.5-Bmi), ( just for 1 day. And only 3 days in 2 years. (Once a year). After that, I raise my BMI's healthy levels again. I see peoples on the internet with 15 BMI looks very skinny but not looking deadly or sick. I try to eat liver, sardines, lots of veggies, and add spleen to my diet because I fear low iron levels. I drop my weight so slowly and gain slowly again. Michael Rae is also low at 15.7 BMI but looks good.

Are you ever try so low BMI levels? Is it very dangerous? 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Edited by Deniz
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The most important factor is nutritional adequacy. A low bmi could mean considerable malnourishment. Do you use cron-o- meter to assess your nutrients levels. It’s important to be sure the foods you list there are complete in the nutrional data. When you add a food make sure it has 78 listed nutrients. Protein is especially critical for someone with a low bmi. You don’t want to be deficient. But ultimately I’d be very careful that you are getting adequate nutrition across the board.

https://cronometer.com/

 

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9 minutes ago, Mike41 said:

The most important factor is nutritional adequacy. A low bmi could mean considerable malnourishment. Do you use cron-o- meter to assess your nutrients levels. It’s important to be sure the foods you list there are complete in the nutrional data. When you add a food make sure it has 78 listed nutrients. Protein is especially critical for someone with a low bmi. You don’t want to be deficient. But ultimately I’d be very careful that you are getting adequate nutrition across the board.

https://cronometer.com/

 

Thank you so much, for commenting.

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Deniz, what's your purpose in pursuing such an extremely low BMI? Generally speaking, research suggests that it tends not to be favorable to longevity. The statistical optimum is higher up. Bottom line, unless you are a genetic outlier, or take exceptional precautions, you may be navigating dangerous waters.

Michael Rae is far above the average as far as precautions are taken and this is a safeguard.

Edited by mccoy
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He says he:

15 hours ago, Deniz said:

need to drop 40.6kg or under 41kg(15.5-Bmi), ( just for 1 day. And only 3 days in 2 years. (Once a year).

I thought maybe he was a competitive boxer but even 'mini flyweight' and 'straweight' (the lightest categories) in boxing is 47.6kg

 

 

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On 12/9/2021 at 2:55 AM, Deniz said:

My height is 162cm and my weight is 47kg. I feel great. But 3 years later, I need to drop 40.6kg or under 41kg(15.5-Bmi), (  just for 1 day. And only 3 days in 2 years. (Once a year). After that, I raise my BMI's healthy levels again. [...] I drop my weight so slowly and gain slowly again

I'm sorry but it's not clear what you are trying to do and why.     Why do you need to drop to 40.6kg?  

Why for just a day?  "3 days in 2 years (once a year)" ???   

You plan to get back to 47kg?  

What's the point of this loss/gain yo-yo?  What theory is this plan based on?

On 12/9/2021 at 2:55 AM, Deniz said:

Are you ever try so low BMI levels? Is it very dangerous? 

Yes, it's quite dangerous.  Whether it's "too dangerous" depends on the individual.  Be careful!

 

Edited by Sibiriak
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Thank you all for commenting,

I think it's too much for me and not worth it. The physician I'm familiar with says, maybe you can lose some more weight and be free from compulsory military service, don't waste your time, etc. But we don't think that kind of low.

 

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On 12/12/2021 at 4:26 AM, Deniz said:

maybe you can lose some more weight and be free from compulsory military service

Yes, mandatory draft at age 18, I remember many many years ago, the thinnest boys (under a chest-diameter threshold) were rejected. But some of us made a point of being muscular, it was considered a shame to be rejected for such a cause! True men did not get discarded for a small chest.

Edited by mccoy
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11 hours ago, mccoy said:

Yes, mandatory draft at age 18, I remember many many years ago, the thinnest boys (under a chest-diameter threshold) were rejected. But some of us made a point of being muscular, it was considered a shame to be rejected for such a cause! True men did not get discarded for a small chest.

When I do bodybuilding my kg was 70 I think be a commando in my military service.

Cron diet is hard to be acceptable in patriarchal societies it's viewed as unmanly or childish. But who cares?

People's pushing me out of the diet.😂

But if your main goal is to slow down the aging and increase health span and life span cron diet is a better way.

Edited by Deniz
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22 hours ago, Deniz said:

But if your main goal is to slow down the aging and increase health span and life span cron diet is a better way.

Maybe so, but optimization is always possible. In other threads, it has been discussed if a BMI as low as possible is really favorable to longevity, but the result is that the optimum for longevity, on average, is probably around 20. On average also means that single individuals may have an advantage with smaller BMIs, others with larger. A typical example is muscle mass, which increases BMI and provides some metabolic benefits. A muscular man may reach a longevity optimum at BMI values of 22-23 for example. Of course, it may be that the larger amount of calories needed to maintain that muscle may be slightly unfavorable to longevity. But there is no evidence about this, in the end we are still reasoning by personal beliefs mainly.

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Part of the problem with BMI data is confounding. Very thin are more likely to be malnourished, smokers, druggies and just plain unhealthy causing poor appetite for instance. A person like Michael Rae I doubt has any concerns wrt his low BMI as he is very careful to be adequately nourished and is not an addict or sickly.

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Mike, I don't remember the latest considerations in the specific thread. Of course there may be confounding factors, one of them being using BMI as a proxy for adiposity, but these should be adjusted for in serious studies. 

Also, in our case the question as I see it should be the following one:

Given that there exists a specific subset of people who are very health-conscious and able to keep their nutritional status optimal and able to follow an efficacious regime of diet and lifestyle, this subset of people will exhibit a statistical relationship between BMI(adiposity) and excess relative risk of mortality. 

In this specific subset, is there evidence of lesser all-cause mortality for small BMIs? Is there a threshold? Is there evidence of lesser mortality for single risk factors (cardiovascular, cancer, and so on).

I don't know if there exists such a study, I doubt it.

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My guess/bet for the specific subset is that we may have a U curve for mortality, but less pronounced than in the larger set (less mortality increase for the extremes) and a wider range of optimum values where the risk is negative or zero. In other words, for the specific subset of scrupolously health-conscious people, BMI would not influence mortality risk very significantly, barring extreme values.

Edited by mccoy
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On 12/16/2021 at 8:04 AM, mccoy said:

Mike, I don't remember the latest considerations in the specific thread. Of course there may be confounding factors, one of them being using BMI as a proxy for adiposity, but these should be adjusted for in serious studies. 

Also, in our case the question as I see it should be the following one:

Given that there exists a specific subset of people who are very health-conscious and able to keep their nutritional status optimal and able to follow an efficacious regime of diet and lifestyle, this subset of people will exhibit a statistical relationship between BMI(adiposity) and excess relative risk of mortality. 

In this specific subset, is there evidence of lesser all-cause mortality for small BMIs? Is there a threshold? Is there evidence of lesser mortality for single risk factors (cardiovascular, cancer, and so on).

I don't know if there exists such a study, I doubt it.

Luigi's study.

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I gather that the studies on rodents exhibit different results with different strains of mice (in some strains CR decreases longevity), and this has been discussed extensively in this forum, maybe Saul referred to the Calaries (uncertain on the denomination) study on real people.

The fact is that the study AFAIK is still in progress and there are few or no mortalities yet. Hope it remains so (no deaths), LOL. Also, the study is on those who practice CR, whereas my considerations were relative to a subset of very health-conscious people, some of which practice CR and have a low BMI, some others of which do not practice CR and have a higher BMI.

Again, my hypothesis is that BMI (within limits of course) is not a significantly governing factor in the longevity of very health-conscious people who adhere to a certain lifestyle (proper nutrition, supplementation, exercise, sleep, stress management, control of metabolic parameters and so on). I may be wrong of course, but the hypothesis sounds very reasonable.

Edited by mccoy
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