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alexthegra8

Cancer prevention advice for the genetically pre-disposed...

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Dear all,

my mother, 60 years old, diabetic (type 2), and daily smoker, recently had a 300g tumor removed from her kidney. In conjunction, she has been diagnosed w/ Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and is currently on the path to trying to get it treated...

In my family, on both sides, AML has been a terminal illness (my father's mom, however, lived until age 90 with it likely due to being a healthy eater and not overweight).

- My question is thus, how can I (32 year old male, 67kg, 176cm), go about in attempting to prevent what might be the inevitable? Of all terminal illnesses, cancer seems to be  the one that is hardest to prevent (compared to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, etc).

- I am on a CR diet (1500 cal per day), lift weights 4-5 times a week (20-30 min kettlebell work); ride around 100km on the bike each week (total around 3+ hours). 

 

Thank you for your responses,

Edited by alexthegra8

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I hear ya, my Dad had prostate cancer, melanoma, and thyroid cancer but he is still alive and well minus a couple organs 😉

This has also been on my mind recently because my father in law was diagnosed with prostate cancer last year, it was treated with chemotherapy and radiation which in turn seems to have damaged his lungs leading to a deterioration in his health over the prior 6-12 months, and ultimately to acute respiratory failure and death last month (not covid related in any way).  He was 73 years old.  We are still in shock about it but I guess 73 isn't really that far off from the average life expectancy for an American man.  He also ate the standard American diet and was overweight.

I think your best odds of avoiding cancer to whatever extent it can be avoided, are just the basics everyone knows about - healthy diet, exercise, sleep, and a BMI <22.  Beyond that it's probably beneficial to avoid spiking IGF-1 frequently, and the best way to avoid that is probably by eating a mostly plant based diet or at least eliminating dairy from one's diet.

Nutritionfacts has a bunch of vids related to cancer prevention, for example:

https://nutritionfacts.org/?s=prostate+cancer

 

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1 hour ago, AlanPater said:

66.5 assuming he was white and born in 1948

Wow, didn't realize it was that low. His Dad lived to 89 and Mom to 93.

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7 hours ago, Gordo said:

I hear ya, my Dad had prostate cancer, melanoma, and thyroid cancer but he is still alive and well minus a couple organs 😉

This has also been on my mind recently because my father in law was diagnosed with prostate cancer last year, it was treated with chemotherapy and radiation which in turn seems to have damaged his lungs leading to a deterioration in his health over the prior 6-12 months, and ultimately to acute respiratory failure and death last month (not covid related in any way).  He was 73 years old.  We are still in shock about it but I guess 73 isn't really that far off from the average life expectancy for an American man.  He also ate the standard American diet and was overweight.

I think your best odds of avoiding cancer to whatever extent it can be avoided, are just the basics everyone knows about - healthy diet, exercise, sleep, and a BMI <22.  Beyond that it's probably beneficial to avoid spiking IGF-1 frequently, and the best way to avoid that is probably by eating a mostly plant based diet or at least eliminating dairy from one's diet.

Nutritionfacts has a bunch of vids related to cancer prevention, for example:

https://nutritionfacts.org/?s=prostate+cancer

 

Thanks yes I am aware of the literature on IGF-1, an interesting dynamic here is fasting; I regularly fast (20/4) and eat basically three small meals between 2-6pm. I do this for hormesis and generally have become leaner and started to look younger over the last 1.5 years of doing this. Does fasting spike growth hormone? If so, how does this counteract the benefits it produces to mitochondria?

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7 hours ago, Gordo said:

 

Amazing how the Czech Republic has a relatively low incidence rate; the average eating regimen here is highly fatty pork, fried cheese, bread, potatoes, and literally no vegetables (not to mention soy) other than red cabbage : )

Edited by alexthegra8

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