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The Randle cycle


mccoy
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Ah yes, sorry Kenton, my point is that this is yet another mechanism which may account for glycaemic intolerance when fatty acids are abundant in the bloodstream.

In a few words, many fats would tend to compete with glucose for oxidation (Randle theory) or impair glucose transport to the muscle cells (intramyocellular lipids theory).  Hence, according to the above theories, a diet with carbs with a low glycaemic index and moderate amounts of fats should not be diabetogenic (all other things being equal).

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6 hours ago, mccoy said:

In a few words, many fats would tend to compete with glucose for oxidation (Randle theory) or impair glucose transport to the muscle cells (intramyocellular lipids theory).  Hence, according to the above theories, a diet with carbs with a low glycaemic index and moderate amounts of fats should not be diabetogenic (all other things being equal).

The folk wisdom of the keto community and my personal experience is omega 6 pufa is the primary culprit for elevating triglycerides and other dietary fats are rarely an issue.  Fructose and ethanol are the main drivers of fatty liver which commonly is accompanied by elevated fasting triglycerides.  And coffee even black and especially unfiltered causes elevated triglycerides in a moderate percentage of people.

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