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What are some endogeneous (latent) cellular viruses that could accelerate aging/produce effects later on in life? [virome/viral load => dementia]


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https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/51/7/3223/7084602?login=false

https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/51/7/3223/7084602

 

https://www.rapamycin.news/t/is-sexual-abstinence-pro-longevity-because-it-lowers-viral-load-from-viruses-like-cmv-epstein-barr-and-the-herpesviruses/5913/14


 

Quote

 

Me, [4/26/2023 14:58 PM]
https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/51/7/3223/7084602
First time latent viruses in organ tissues have been sequenced

Me, [4/26/2023 15:00 PM]
Blood is absolutely chock full of TTV
A mysterious virus that may just be naked dna floating in the bloodstream resistant to DNAse

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fviro.2022.821298/full#:~:text=Torque teno virus (TTV) is,in human serum (1).

 

Quote

 

Me, [4/26/2023 14:58 PM]
https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/51/7/3223/7084602
First time latent viruses in organ tissues have been sequenced

Me, [4/26/2023 15:00 PM]
Blood is absolutely chock full of TTV
A mysterious virus that may just be naked dna floating in the bloodstream resistant to DNAse

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fviro.2022.821298/full#:~:text=Torque teno virus (TTV) is,in human serum (1).

Me, [4/26/2023 15:03 PM]
"HHV-6A and HHV-6B infect almost all of the human populations that have been tested.[2]
HHV-6A has been described as more neurovirulent,[3] (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurovirulent) and as such is more frequently found in patients with neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.[4] (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sclerosis) HHV-6 (and HHV-7) levels in the brain are also elevated in people with Alzheimer's disease." (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alzheimer%27s_disease)

Me, [4/26/2023 15:07 PM]
"The origin of replication (often labeled as "oriLyt" in the literature) is where DNA replication begins.[21] The direct repeat termini (DRL and DRR) possess a repeated TTAGGG sequence, identical to that of human telomeres. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telomeres) Variability in the number of telomeric repeats is observed in the range of 15–180.[23][24] These termini also contain pac-1 and pac-2 cleavage and packing signals that are conserved among herpesviruses."

HHV-6 has an origin of replication identical to human telomeres 🤯🤯🤯
The immune system can't just attack anything with that ORI because it's in every human cell

Me, [4/26/2023 15:10 PM]
Oh no, and then it integrates into the chromosome and into the telomeres

Me, [4/26/2023 15:11 PM]
And it prevents the cell from killing itself allowing diseased cells to replicate and live, which is part of the main issue with these latent viruses

 

Quote

 

Me, [4/26/2023 14:58 PM]
https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/51/7/3223/7084602
First time latent viruses in organ tissues have been sequenced

Me, [4/26/2023 15:00 PM]
Blood is absolutely chock full of TTV
A mysterious virus that may just be naked dna floating in the bloodstream resistant to DNAse

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fviro.2022.821298/full#:~:text=Torque teno virus (TTV) is,in human serum (1).

Me, [4/26/2023 15:03 PM]
"HHV-6A and HHV-6B infect almost all of the human populations that have been tested.[2]
HHV-6A has been described as more neurovirulent,[3] (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurovirulent) and as such is more frequently found in patients with neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.[4] (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sclerosis) HHV-6 (and HHV-7) levels in the brain are also elevated in people with Alzheimer's disease." (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alzheimer%27s_disease)

Me, [4/26/2023 15:07 PM]
"The origin of replication (often labeled as "oriLyt" in the literature) is where DNA replication begins.[21] The direct repeat termini (DRL and DRR) possess a repeated TTAGGG sequence, identical to that of human telomeres. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telomeres) Variability in the number of telomeric repeats is observed in the range of 15–180.[23][24] These termini also contain pac-1 and pac-2 cleavage and packing signals that are conserved among herpesviruses."

HHV-6 has an origin of replication identical to human telomeres 🤯🤯🤯
The immune system can't just attack anything with that ORI because it's in every human cell

Me, [4/26/2023 15:10 PM]
Oh no, and then it integrates into the chromosome and into the telomeres

Me, [4/26/2023 15:11 PM]
And it prevents the cell from killing itself allowing diseased cells to replicate and live, which is part of the main issue with these latent viruses

Me, [4/29/2023 19:54 PM]
SV40 is in everything as the most used model eukaryotic promoter sequence to enhance expression of a trans gene

Me, [4/29/2023 19:56 PM]
The promoter sequence from SV40 on its own does not induce cancer afaik. It is the rest of the sv40 virus that does that.

Typically viruses induce cancer by shutting off the cells autophagy mechanisms through other means

 

 

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  • InquilineKea changed the title to What are some endogeneous (latent) cellular viruses that could produce effects later on in life? [the virome]

https://archive.ph/3qctF

Viruses staying in the human body long-term: drivers of aging

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Friday, May 12th

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16:00 - 17:00

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Dome

 

This talk by Amy Proal, PhD (PolyBio Research Foundation) will explain how humans are holobionts comprising trillions of microbial and viral organisms whose collective functioning impacts biological signaling. The viral component of this holobiont is referred to as the “human virome.” This virome contains bacteriophage and DNA/RNA viruses. Bacteriophage are viruses that infect bacteria and modulate their activity, and trillions of bacteriophage traffic human tissue and blood at any given moment. 

 

 

 

However, despite the fact that human and virus biology is intricately connected, certain DNA and RNA virome members such as herpesviruses can contribute to diseases of aging and inflammaging. These viruses have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to directly hijack the activity of the human genome, the human immune response, and human metabolism. For example, the amyloid beta “plaque” that accumulates in the Alzheimer’s brain is now being studied as a peptide that forms in response to viral pathogens in brain tissue[1].

 

 

 

Persistent viruses can also disrupt human signaling directly connected to aging processes. For example, one network analysis uncovered dozens of viruses encoding proteins experimentally demonstrated to interact with proteins from pathways associated with human aging, including cellular senescence[2]. Viral infection can also have profound effects on host cell processes relevant to telomere biology and genome maintenance[3], with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) capable of driving telomere dysfunction by directly integrating into host telomeric DNA.

 

 

 

Human virome-driven contributions to aging processes may be rapidly accelerating due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The SARS-CoV-2 virus driving the COVID-19 pandemic is increasingly being studied as a virus capable of long-term persistence in a wide range of human body and brain sites[4]. We may consequently be seeding the human population with yet one more virus that can drive human genome, metabolic and senescence-related dysfunction under certain conditions.

 

 

 

It follows that the rapid development of novel antiviral drugs, immunotherapies, and prophylactics could help control virome activity in a manner that should promote human longevity. However, development and use of these novel therapeutics must be done with great transparency. The general public must be fully engaged in the process, so that potential side effects and the “risk-reward” ratios for certain therapeutics can be thoughtfully evaluated and debated. 

 

 

 

References:

 

 

 

1. Eimer WA, Vijaya Kumar DK, Navalpur Shanmugam NK, et al. Alzheimer’s Disease-Associated β-Amyloid Is Rapidly Seeded by Herpesviridae to Protect against Brain Infection. Neuron. 2018;99(1):56. doi:10.1016/J.NEURON.2018.06.030

 

2. Teulière J, Bernard C, Bonnefous H, Martens J, Lopez P, Bapteste E. Interactomics: Dozens of Viruses, Co-evolving With Humans, Including the Influenza A Virus, may Actively Distort Human Aging. Mol Biol Evol. 2023;40(2). doi:10.1093/MOLBEV/MSAD012

 

3. Deng Z, Wang Z, Lieberman PM. Telomeres and viruses: common themes of genome maintenance. Front Oncol. 2012;2. doi:10.3389/FONC.2012.00201

 

4. Stein SR, Ramelli SC, Grazioli A, et al. SARS-CoV-2 infection and persistence in the human body and brain at autopsy. Nature 2022 612:7941. 2022;612(7941):758-763. doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05542-y 

 

 
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  • InquilineKea changed the title to What are some endogeneous (latent) cellular viruses that could accelerate aging/produce effects later on in life? [the virome]

Broad Institute of MIT and HarvardBroad Institute of MIT and Harvard 90,727 followers90,727 followers

 
 
New research suggests that centenarians — people who live to be at least 100 — have a diverse collection of viruses in their gut that could help protect them from infectious diseases.

Researchers analyzed the viromes, or viral genomes, from 195 individuals from Japan and Sardinia. They found that centenarians had a greater diversity of bacteria and viruses in their guts. The study sheds light on some of the biological pathways that may help centenarians live long, healthy lives and adds to a growing body of evidence showing that the interactions between bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the gut play an important role in preventing age-related conditions.

#BroadInstitute #Science #ScienceNews #ScientificResearch #Research
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  • InquilineKea changed the title to What are some endogeneous (latent) cellular viruses that could accelerate aging/produce effects later on in life? [virome/viral load => dementia]
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It appears that our viromes begin to accumulate when we are born. Studies reveal a high diversity of viruses in the infant gut shortly after birth, suggesting that they probably come from the babies’ mothers, some ingested from breast milk. Some of these viruses decline in number as infants grow to weeks or months old; others enter their bodies from the air, water, food and other people. These viruses grow in number and diversity, infecting cells where they will persist for years. Infant viromes are unstable, whereas adult viromes are relatively stable. Anelloviruses, a family of 200 different species, are present in almost everyone as we get older. This mirrors what we observe for bacteria as well.

 

 

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