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Occasionally I would like to contact another member privately, however although I am a member if I click on another members name I receive a message stating you are not authorised to view profiles.............on the old lists it is easy enough to contact members individually , how is done on here?

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Occasionally I would like to contact another member privately, however although I am a member if I click on another members name I receive a message stating you are not authorised to view profiles.............on the old lists it is easy enough to contact members individually , how is done on here?

 

Clicking on the little envelope icon to the left of each post brings up "PM this Member". But this does require that the member has posted a message publicly.

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No, I get no popup.

 

Possibly related: when I click on the "bust" icon next to the 'follow/unfollow' button at the top right of the page, it shows me all the following members, whose member names are now links (they're just dead text in the Forum post IDs), but when I click on their namess I get, "

Sorry, you don't have permission for that!

[#10245]

You are not permitted to view member profiles.

 

... which seems unreasonable: if I, as a registered user and CRS member, can't see them, who can?

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Hey dear firends, i am newbie here, so hope will have nice enjoyable stay here!

 

Welcome to the forum! :) 

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Hello, I also just signed up. Do any members of this forum have a GitHub to which I can contribute? I'm trying to find software projects about which I am passionate.

I did a search on GitHub for "nutrition" and was quickly overwhelmed by the myriad search results. Also, the issues for one of the repositories I looked at seemed more technical, and by that I mean above my level of programming expertise, and it didn't seem like the level of nutritional knowledge I possess would have helped to resolve that issue in that particular repository.

I have an Excel spreadsheet full of nutrition information I've been appending to when I eat a new food. I'd be happy to make that public so people don't have to manually input their own nutrition data. If anyone would like that, please let me know.

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Hello.  I am a newbie here.  I'm a retired RN (6 years), married and live in California.  I'll be 60 this November.  My problems started after age 52 when I hit menopause, a back surgery and lost my job of 20 years and had to start a new one.  Since then, I've pretty much been battling weight gain (particularly around the waist and butt but really, all over), high blood pressure and what my doctor called a little insulin resistance. I went from 105lbs to 120 within 3 years.  As an amatuer dancer for most of my life, I didn't like this new weight or shape or the malaise and other symptoms that went with it: low sex drive, poor sleep and constant fatigue, poor concentration and just general apathy. I tried cutting out sugar and refined carbs and age "healthy" but it changed very little weight wise or otherwise. I tried restricting my calories to 1400-1600 but that didn't help.  Last November, I read about CR and embarked on a 900-1000 calorie diet consisting of berries, almond milk, green, yellow and purple veg, beans, nuts and a little fish.  I stayed on it for 2 months.  My results were astonishing! I lost 10 lbs, my blood pressure dropped and I no longer needed afternoon naps.  My blood work came back perfect! The past few weeks, I've slid back into old habits again so I'm back on it.  My father who is 90, has been doing CR for the past 10-15 years and he is sharp, healthy and vibrant.  I hope to follow in his tracks.

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On 6/12/2020 at 4:57 PM, Stit60 said:

Hello.  I am a newbie here.  I'm a retired RN (6 years), married and live in California.  I'll be 60 this November.  My problems started after age 52 when I hit menopause, a back surgery and lost my job of 20 years and had to start a new one.  Since then, I've pretty much been battling weight gain (particularly around the waist and butt but really, all over), high blood pressure and what my doctor called a little insulin resistance. I went from 105lbs to 120 within 3 years.  As an amatuer dancer for most of my life, I didn't like this new weight or shape or the malaise and other symptoms that went with it: low sex drive, poor sleep and constant fatigue, poor concentration and just general apathy. I tried cutting out sugar and refined carbs and age "healthy" but it changed very little weight wise or otherwise. I tried restricting my calories to 1400-1600 but that didn't help.  Last November, I read about CR and embarked on a 900-1000 calorie diet consisting of berries, almond milk, green, yellow and purple veg, beans, nuts and a little fish.  I stayed on it for 2 months.  My results were astonishing! I lost 10 lbs, my blood pressure dropped and I no longer needed afternoon naps.  My blood work came back perfect! The past few weeks, I've slid back into old habits again so I'm back on it.  My father who is 90, has been doing CR for the past 10-15 years and he is sharp, healthy and vibrant.  I hope to follow in his tracks.

That is wonderful progress! Im in my 60s here in NorCal, practicing CR on anf off for 10 years, very seriously for the last 3. 1100 cal a day, lotsa veg and berries and miles underfoot.

Cheers

Carol

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The sci-hub site for getting free pdfs  [...]

 

EDIT, MR: ... is irrelevant in this Forum, since we do not encourage copyright infringement.

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Dietary nicotine intake and risk of Parkinson disease: a prospective study.
Ma C, Molsberry S, Li Y, Schwarzschild M, Ascherio A, Gao X.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2020 Oct 1;112(4):1080-1087. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa186.
PMID: 32725131
Abstract
Background: Tobacco use was observed to be associated with a lower risk of Parkinson disease (PD) in previous epidemiologic studies, with nicotine as a potential candidate. The association between dietary nicotine and PD risk has, however, not been examined in prospective studies yet.
Objectives: We aimed to examine prospectively the association between dietary nicotine intake and subsequent PD risk among never-smokers.
Methods: The current study was based on never-smoker participants from 2 large prospective cohorts: the Nurses' Health Study (n = 31,615) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 19,523). The studies contained information on dietary nicotine intake from 1986 from validated FFQs. Dietary nicotine intake was calculated based on consumption of peppers, tomatoes, processed tomatoes, potatoes, and tea. Incident cases of PD were identified via questionnaires and subsequently confirmed by reviewing medical records. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate cohort-specific HRs, and used fixed-effects models to calculate the pooled HR.
Results: During 26 y of follow-up, we identified 601 incident PD cases (296 women and 305 men). After adjusting for potential covariates, the pooled HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of dietary nicotine intake was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.51, 0.94). The significant inverse association was, however, only observed in women (adjusted HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.96), not in men (adjusted HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.50, 1.20). Further adjusting for environmental tobacco smoke exposure, family history of PD, and use of ibuprofen generated similar significant results in women. Consistently, greater consumption of peppers was associated with lower risk of PD (adjusted HR for ≥5 times/wk compared with ≤3 times/mo: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.94) in women but not in men (adjusted HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.57, 1.90).
Conclusions: Women with greater dietary nicotine intake had a lower risk of PD than those with lower intake.
Keywords: Parkinson disease; cohort; dietary nicotine; neurodegenerative disease; prospective study.

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