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Guest JCron

Guar Gum and other fiber supplements

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Guest JCron

Hi;

 

I'm new to this site, but I have read about CRON here and there over several years. I've been counting my calories and have found a special high fiber cereal to be extremely useful in making me feel fuller/happier on fewer calories.

 

I was surprised, because I otherwise eat a high fiber diet: mostly legumes, brown rice, frozen vegetables, some soy and fruit. I never felt as full as I did with this high fiber cereal. I guess I got used to the higher level of fiber of my diet.

 

I was on a cron yahoo group a few years ago. Someone mentioned that they took guar gum to help them make it through mid day. I thought that was odd at the time, but after my cereal experience I see that guar gum supplements are sold as a diet aide. The only two significant points I found on the web about using guar gum as a "diet aide" is to be sure to drink a lot of water with it to avoid it blocking your "innards", don't take a lot at once and that it may not work.

 

I read that guar gum is derived from a legume. Does this mean that it may cause gas as eating a plate of legumes might?

 

The cereal I have been eating gets most of its fiber from wheat bran, oat bran and psyllium seeds.

 

I thought it might be interesting to experiment with different types of fiber supplements in case I wanted to cut down on my wheat intake. I know that there are different types of fiber. What have been people's personal experiences with different types of fiber keeping them full? Do the soluble fibers of oats & legumes work better than the fibers found in wheat bran?

 

Just curious

 

Thanks in advance for any useful info

 

Steve

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Guest bob cavanaugh

Fiber is fiber. Your stomach and "innards" care not from where it came. It simply passes through undigested and sops up some fat and cholesterol and other nasties on the way through.

 

Fiber is filling. Think of eating wood...you would feel full for quite a while, and yes, you would need to drink lots of water. You're simply doing it on a much smaller scale.

 

Bob

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Hi;

 

I'm new to this site, but I have read about CRON here and there over several years. I've been counting my calories and have found a special high fiber cereal to be extremely useful in making me feel fuller/happier on fewer calories.

 

I was surprised, because I otherwise eat a high fiber diet: mostly legumes, brown rice, frozen vegetables, some soy and fruit. I never felt as full as I did with this high fiber cereal. I guess I got used to the higher level of fiber of my diet.

 

I was on a cron yahoo group a few years ago. Someone mentioned that they took guar gum to help them make it through mid day. I thought that was odd at the time, but after my cereal experience I see that guar gum supplements are sold as a diet aide. The only two significant points I found on the web about using guar gum as a "diet aide" is to be sure to drink a lot of water with it to avoid it blocking your "innards", don't take a lot at once and that it may not work.

 

I read that guar gum is derived from a legume. Does this mean that it may cause gas as eating a plate of legumes might?

 

The cereal I have been eating gets most of its fiber from wheat bran, oat bran and psyllium seeds.

 

I thought it might be interesting to experiment with different types of fiber supplements in case I wanted to cut down on my wheat intake. I know that there are different types of fiber. What have been people's personal experiences with different types of fiber keeping them full? Do the soluble fibers of oats & legumes work better than the fibers found in wheat bran?

 

Just curious

 

Thanks in advance for any useful info

 

Steve

 

My perception was that guar gum stayed with me longer than bran. I presumed this was due to the guar gum's viscosity attribute.

 

Also, I did not feel reduced hunger at time of eating, but instead I noticed this benefit later. Around 8 hrs after ingestion or the next day. This encouraged me to take in small amounts spread out over an hour, 2 or 3 times per day, in order to smooth hunger fluctuations. I no longer use guar gum though.

 

Apricot

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Fiber has zero influence whatsoever on my own hunger/cravings. It's disappointing as I enjoy high-fiber foods such as oatmeal. Just an anecdote, of course, but I eat as much as 50 grams of fiber a day (not in supplement form), yet my appetite (for fatty foods such as peanut butter) remains utterly insatiable.

 

Don't buy the fiber vs hunger hype.

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Guest peg d

Fiber has zero influence whatsoever on my own hunger/cravings. It's disappointing as I enjoy high-fiber foods such as oatmeal. Just an anecdote, of course, but I eat as much as 50 grams of fiber a day (not in supplement form), yet my appetite (for fatty foods such as peanut butter) remains utterly insatiable.

 

Don't buy the fiber vs hunger hype.

 

I used guar gum in the past. I added it to smoothies. Since it swells in the stomach this would be the reason for it's satiation effect I imagine. I see that guar gum is in many supermarket baked goods. One bad experience has put me off guar gum but after reading this thread I might get back on it. Just be warned that unless enough water/liquid is consumed with it a bolus will form in the esophagus and that aint pleasant.

Peg D

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I've recently purchased a Vita-Mix so that I can make green smoothies. I'm very happy to report that this too helps me to manage hunger, and I have some theories about why this is so. Granted, my drinks are heavy on greens and taste a bit like sweetened chlorophyll, but I like the effect on hunger so I am encouraged to keep drinking every day. Today's drink was:

- 1 red chard leaf

- handful of green leaf lettuce

- 1/3 baby zuchinni

- 1 celery stalk

- 2 5-6 inch carrots

- 1/3 yellow bell pepper

- 7 blackberries

- 1/4 cup blueberries

- half Gala apple

- small chunk habanero pepper

- few chunks pineapple

- water + few drops of sucralose/neotame mix

 

Apricot

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One should distinguish between soluble fibre -- the kind found in veggies -- and insoluble fibre -- the kind found in cereal bran. Soluble fibre is partially digested by intestinal bacteria, and converted to small chain fatty acids, which are absorbed

through the intestinal wall in the large bowel; you gain perhaps 2-3 calories per gram (as opposed to ca. 5 calories for totally digested carbs, such as starch or (ugh) sugar).

Insoluble fibre is not digested at all, and passes straight through your intestinal tract; it contributes zero calories.

 

-- Saul

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Guest Al Pater

Zounds; fat matters, as does fibers:

 

 

J Nutr. 1997 Apr;127(4):579-86.

Dietary fiber decreases the metabolizable energy content and nutrient digestibility of mixed diets fed to humans.

Baer DJ, Rumpler WV, Miles CW, Fahey GC Jr.

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/127/4/579.long

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/127/4/579.full.pdf+html

 

Abstract

 

Food labeling regulations implemented by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration emphasize nutrient composition and energy content of foods. Dietary energy and digestibility of complex foods can be affected by the content and type of dietary fiber. The metabolizable energy (ME) content and apparent digestibility of dietary fiber in human diets are difficult to assess. Fiber can affect the digestibility of fat and protein and, subsequently, the ME content of the diet. This study was conducted to measure the ME content of nine diets with different fat and fiber concentrations. Diets varied in level of fat (18, 34 or 47% of energy) and level of total dietary fiber (3, 4 or 7% of diet dry matter) and were consumed for 2 wk. Subjects (n = 17) consumed three diets (14 d for each diet) containing different levels of fiber and one level of fat. Food consumption was measured and all urine and feces were collected during a 5-d period. Combustible energy, protein, fat, total dietary fiber (TDF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) were measured in composite samples of food and feces, and urine was analyzed for combustible energy and nitrogen. Metabolizable energy and apparent digestibility coefficients were calculated. Overall, increasing fiber intake decreased fat and protein digestibility. As a consequence of these interactions, the ME content of the diets decreased as fiber intake increased, and TDF and NDF had similar effects on the ME value. A published empirical formula accurately predicted the ME content of diets using either TDF or NDF.

 

PMID:9109608

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