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mccoy

Acutissimin A

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Allegedly, the seasoning of wine (esp red wine) in oak barrels provides further benefits:

 

From teh wiki voice

 

Acutissimin A is a flavono-ellagitannin, a type of tannin formed from the linking of a flavonoid with an ellagitannin.

In 2003, scientists at Institut Européen de Chimie et Biologie in Pessac, Francefound that when the oak tannin vescalagin interacts with a flavanoid in wine acutissimin A is created. In separate studies this phenolic compound has been shown to be 250 times more effective than the pharmaceutical drug Etoposide in stopping the growth of cancerous tumors.[1][2][3]

 

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Thanks for that Mccoy!

 

It just so happens that I'd read something  vague about the effects of  oak barrel aging on wine, and I took up sipping oak-aged  Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec wines from Argentina (which happened to be on the shelves in my neck of the woods.)

 

 

I like  the verbal flair in this abstract:

 

Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2013 Oct 25;52(44):11530-3. doi: 10.1002/anie.201305839. Epub 2013 Sep 13.
 

Remarkable biomimetic chemoselective aerobic oxidation of flavano-ellagitannins found in oak-aged wine.

 

 
 
Abstract

Under the auspices of Bacchus! Acutissimins, natural flavano-ellagitannins, occur in oak-aged wine as a result of a diastereoselective condensation reaction of the flavan-3-ol catechin, a component of grapes, with the C-glucosidic ellagitannin vescalagin, found in oak. The acutissimins are further converted into natural mongolicains and analogues of camelliatannin G in a remarkably chemoselective fashion by simple aerobic oxidation.

 

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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The authors really cater to the inherent geekeness of orthorexists, I love it!

 

Abstract

Under the auspices of Bacchus! Acutissimins, natural flavano-ellagitannins, occur in oak-aged wine as a result of a diastereoselective condensation reaction of the flavan-3-ol catechin, a component of grapes, with the C-glucosidic ellagitannin vescalagin, found in oak. The acutissimins are further converted into natural mongolicains and analogues of camelliatannin G in a remarkably chemoselective fashion by simple aerobic oxidation.

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