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Saul

Another reason why we need our stress-free sleep: Microglia rewire the brain during stress-free sleep

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Today from Science News:  Another article involving the important research being conducted here at the University of Rochester:  Microglia had been thought to be active all the time; not so; they are most active during sleep, especially when we are not stressed (low circulating noreprinephine) 

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5584/the-night-gardeners----immune-cells-rewire-repair-brain-while-we-sleep.aspx

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After having read the posted article, I wonder about the implications with CE. Cold stimulates the secretion of norepinephrine, which inhibits microglial activity...But the microglials are most active during (deep) sleep, when we usually do not practice CE (otherwise we probably wouldn't be able to sleep at all).

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Probably irrelevant to CE.  Possibly more important to "General Health and Longevity" than e.g CE. ( I'm a CE agnostic, but a strong believer is the importance of sleep.)

  --  Saul

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9 minutes ago, Saul said:

Probably irrelevant to CE.  Possibly more important to "General Health and Longevity" than e.g CE. ( I'm a CE agnostic, but a strong believer is the importance of sleep.)

  --  Saul

In theory, CE might influence microglial circulation during sleep, since CE stimulates norepinephrine and microglia are inhibited by such substance.

But I doubt that norepinephrine during sound sleep is secreted in significant amounts since norepinephrine would tend to inhibit sleep as well... Unless specific conditions exist.

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