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Fernando Gabriel

Frugivorous or Vegan

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Vegan would definitely be better, but in your case, I suggest lacto-ovo vegetarian or even pescetarian, since you need to increase your BMI and animal proteins are more efficient for that purpose.

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1 hour ago, mccoy said:

Vegan would definitely be better, but in your case, I suggest lacto-ovo vegetarian or even pescetarian, since you need to increase your BMI and animal proteins are more efficient for that purpose.

And how often should I eat meat to replace heme iron if I am vegan because I have not found a reliable site to replace heme iron?

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I am going to paste a relevant excerpt from Chris Masterjhon's 'testing nutritional status', which is a pretty good practical guide and excellent bang for the buck, which I recommend to all health fanatics. Please read carefully the bolded sentence, you should always ask your doctor.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Quote

Correcting an Iron Deficiency: Correcting an iron deficiency with food is best achieved by
temporarily reducing plant foods across the board and using iron-rich foods such as clams, liver,
and red meat multiple times a day. For vegetarians, sprouted legumes, greens, seaweed, and
Copyright © Chris Masterjohn, 2019. This is an educational resource and is not to be construed in any way as medical or nutritional advice or training. Always ask your doctor
about taking any health-related measures and never ignore professional medical advice on the basis of anything contained herein.
potatoes are the best food sources, and the iron will be best absorbed if accompanied by
500-1000 mg of vitamin C per meal. Individuals who are not vegetarian for ethical reasons
should take the first approach over the second because it will be much more effective.
Supplements that promote detoxification, such as sulforaphane or milk thistle, should be
avoided until the deficiency is corrected.
Iron supplements may often be needed. Ferrous sulfate is the most common, but it contributes
to oxidative stress and bacterial dysbiosis in the intestines and causes constipation and other
undesirable side effects. The supplements I recommend to avoid the risk of these side effects
are Iron Smart liposomal iron and Proferrin ES heme iron . A meal of clams can provide 10-20
milligrams of iron per meal. This alone meets the RDA for everyone except pregnant women,
who require 27 milligrams per day. I recommend using the above iron supplements at one dose
three times per day with a meal.They provide 10-15 milligrams per dose, which is 30-45
milligrams per day. This is similar to what you can get from eating clams twice a day and is
within the tolerable upper intake level set by the Institute of Medicine on the basis of the
gastrointestinal side effects of ferrous sulfate. I would maintain this high dose and retest monthly
until the markers are in range. These can be dropped to once per day as a maintenance dose
thereafter, except for pregnant women the appropriate maintenance dose is twice a day. Iron
supplements should not be given to infants under the age of six months. Iron deficiency that
does not improve with iron supplementation may reflect a need to address copper or riboflavin
deficiencies.

 

Edited by mccoy

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19 hours ago, mccoy said:

I am going to paste a relevant excerpt from Chris Masterjhon's 'testing nutritional status', which is a pretty good practical guide and excellent bang for the buck, which I recommend to all health fanatics. Please read carefully the bolded sentence, you should always ask your doctor.

 

 

what other supplements do I need in the vegan diet because I don't want my IQ to go down.

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