Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

I danced ballet, modern, jazz, lots of goofy hip hop on cafeteria floors and streets with fellow hooligans haha... No biggie injuries until the bicycle crash. Then kaput. Endsville. When an orthopedist tells you, oh we'll just clip out that damaged cartilege and you'll be hunky dory again, they really don't tell you the truth. And as it turns out a partial meniscectomy is no better than placebo. Major sadness set in. And all with meniscal damage (everyone it seems in my ex-world) await these promising new meniscal regeneration promises -- which are lies. They're still working on sheep knees. And regrowing white zone (avascular) meniscal cartilege is way, way,waaaaay more complicated than anyone dreamed. Regeneration of avascular cartilege won't be solved by humans (bless their hearts) it'll be solved by artificial intelligence, I'm convinced.

 

I highly appreciate your perspective as a dancer! I have a few ballet DVDs at home. I enjoy them very much!

 

I have a sensitive right knee. After one year’s intensive Badminton, it started to develop pain when I bent it even slightly. I had to slow down, let it heal itself while starting to pick up some gentle Tai Chi(with no jumps!), for the next four years. At several times I had serious doubts about whether I would feel normal about my right knee again.

 

Now it has been over 5 years, it has healed a lot and the pain has gone most of the time. I give Tai Chi a lot of credit for that! It still starts to hurt when I run or jump on hard surface. So now my personal rule is NEVER do that again. Another benefit of Tai Chi is getting more mindful and sensitive about how my body parts respond to pressure and stress. I would stop doing any activity immediately if I sense a slight negative response from my right knee.

 

By the way, the athlete in white in the men's double video is my friend. He is 27. He told me yesterday that he has recently retired. His knees are so bad that he cannot continue for one more year as planned.

Edited by gracezw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's sad about your friend's knee. Does he think landing in the inner knee from tall repeated jumps was a contributing factor? The jump and landing is beautiful! But we pay the price. The question becomes why for me: why am I doing this crazy activity that employers may demand, audiences may gape wow, but bodies suffer as a result? Adrenaline is often flying so high in the moment that we don't even know when we've done significant damage until an hour or two later. Then uh oh.

 

I know ballet dancers retired at 21, and ballet dancers retired at 50. You can still dance professionally into your 40s, but challenges increase. For generations beneath ours and rising, regenerative medicine may help strengthen those parts of us most likely to get shredded. But for now, we have RICE and numbing drugs and patch up therapies and promises for the future. Sad, true, boo, hoo :-(

 

Meanwhile! Keep up with your beautiful Tai Chi!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

That's sad about your friend's knee. Does he think landing in the inner knee from tall repeated jumps was a contributing factor? The jump and landing is beautiful! But we pay the price. The question becomes why for me: why am I doing this crazy activity that employers may demand, audiences may gape wow, but bodies suffer as a result? Adrenaline is often flying so high in the moment that we don't even know when we've done significant damage until an hour or two later. Then uh oh.

 

Certainly that is a contributing factor. Also did you notice how deeply the professional athletes bend their knees for all their Tai Chi moves? Doing that for 8 hours a day and for many years are bad for knees as well.

 

I don’t even bother to watch men’s singles and women’s singles because all those are even more demanding on jumps and other knee work. I only watch doubles because more points are given to synchronize between the two of them than to the crazy jumps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hey Grace, would you mind resending this one -- I can't get it to play :-(

 

Thanks for letting me know that you have problem viewing it. The setting was set to be private. That is probably why you cannot view it. I have turned it to be public. The link is correct. Please try again and let me know. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Grace, for opening up the private viewing! They are definitely amazing people here. As for knees, hyper-mobile people are sometimes advised (in yoga) to not allow the knee to extend past the foot while in deep lunges, or risk ACL injury. But those deep magnificent lunges appear to be part of their beautIful performances. I've been taught the knee is basically a hinge with limited range, and not much lateral ability. It's hard to watch them without focusing on knees! For safer knees, beefing up the quads through strength training has been advice given to me. Riding a bike is great for this and for knees (if the seat is properly height-adjusted).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Grace, for opening up the private viewing! They are definitely amazing people here. As for knees, hyper-mobile people are sometimes advised (in yoga) to not allow the knee to extend past the foot while in deep lunges, or risk ACL injury. But those deep magnificent lunges appear to be part of their beautIful performances. I've been taught the knee is basically a hinge with limited range, and not much lateral ability. It's hard to watch them without focusing on knees! For safer knees, beefing up the quads through strength training has been advice given to me. Riding a bike is great for this and for knees (if the seat is properly height-adjusted).

 

You are certainly right about not extending the knee past the foot while in lunges. That should be the rule for Tai Chi as well. And yes I agree that the deep stances look magnificent. I held my breath for my friend when I watched this video of 2015 for the first time. In that video, hee and his partner won the third place. Back in 2014, they won the first place. I noticed that his knees looked and felt stiffer in 2015.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×