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mccoy

Multiple spice mix

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This is a thread which has been inspired by Dean's 20 spices mix which he cited in the other thread on EVOO,

I believe that we are all, to a greater or lesser extent, convinced about the validity of the xenohormetic theory, according to which the typical molecules of spices, which often are just phytotoxins, are poisonous to insects and other small lifeforms but beneficial to humans, in very moderate amounts as used in food preparations and dressing.

So, having ready at hand such a xenhormetic mix as Dean does is sure an example to follow. Now, with all the caveats on the possible loss of properties of dried and ground spices, which we can sure alleviate by eating some fresh ones, quantity (number of spices) arguably equals diversification and a possibly greater range of effect of the hormetic principles/molecules.

To make it short, I started reading the ingredients of the curry powder I have in my kitchen. It's 15 different spices already ground together. On top of that I prepared a mix of 7 more common mediterranean spices plus nutmeg. To these, we may add cinnamom maybe in a separate container to use in drinks (I use it in my cacao drink), but I saw cinnamom is also used in some ethnic spice mixes . Plus I use some occasional more expensive spices like saffron and vanilla. It adds to 23 different spices in two different containers, plus cinnamom= 24, plus others to mix occasionally.

I'm going to prepare a list to which we may add more and see it is possible to reach a number of 30 spices to use daily for a very wide range xenohormetic effect. Dean's idea is very good in that it's convenient to have one or two containers only and we dont' forget to use single spices.

15 spices found in a commercial curry (supermarket):

  • turmeric
  • coriander
  • cumin
  • fenugreek
  • ginger
  • garlic
  • cloves
  • pimiento
  • senape
  • laurel
  • chili
  • fennel seed
  • cardamom
  • white peper
  • black pepper

7 Mediterranean spices I could find and mix, plus nutmeg:

  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Parsely
  • Thyme
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • onion herb
  • Marjoran
  • nutmeg

Other possible ones, which I could not find ground, are anice,seeds star anice, also there are pink and green pepper. And who knows how many more ethnic spices...

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by mccoy

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Another spice which I just discovered I had stashed at the bottom of the drawer, I think in English it's called dill

Thus, my med spice mix now has expanded into 8 components:

  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Parsely
  • Thyme
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • onion herb
  • Marjoran
  • nutmeg
  • Dill

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On 6/19/2019 at 8:16 PM, mccoy said:

I added two more spices to my mediterranean mix, this is the update list, including now 12 components (nutmeg is not mediterranean but isn't in the other mix):

  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Parsely
  • Thyme
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • onion herb
  • Marjoran
  • nutmeg
  • Dill
  • Mint
  • Tarragon

 

To the above, I'll add the 15 components of the curry mix, so in total it's 27 spices.

On foods, it tastes at first weird, but after a little you get the habit to the peculiar taste. It now tastes salty.

I'm planning to add more and reach at least 30 ingredients. But now I'm using cinnamon and saffron separately. It makes 29. I just need to hit #30!!!

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On 6/18/2019 at 3:42 PM, mccoy said:

7 Mediterranean spices I could find and mix, plus nutmeg:

  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Parsely
  • Thyme
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • onion herb
  • Marjoran

I think most consider leaves to be herbs and other strong flavored plant parts to be spices.

Curiously though when it comes to tea it seems mostly reversed as true teas made from leaves of tea plants genus Camellia are not considered herbal while tissanes that are mostly spices such as licorice, ginger and cinnamon or flower buds such as chamomile and elderberry or fruit such as rose hips are called herbal teas.  Which makes perfect sense in the context of vegetable oils being made from seeds and not vegetables, sweetbreads being neither, sweetmeats being meatless, many vegetables such as squash and green beans actually being fruit while strawberries, blackberries and raspberries are not berries although watermelon, pumpkins and bananas are berries.

I don't know enough of other languages to know if confusion is mostly an English thing or if it is a human thing.

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Todd, thanks for this semantic reflection, I too like to nitpick the meaning of words,

By checking the definition there may be apparently some ambiguity, even though most definitions tend to explicitly include into the category exotic spices such as ginger, nutmeg, cinnamom, paprika.

In Italian, even as in English,  spices refers traditionally usually to the exotic  specieses but in a wide sense they may be domestic , although the term 'aromatic herbs' applies more specifically to local products like rosemary, basil, marjorane and so on.

 

 

Edited by mccoy

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The list expanded to 14 elements in the non-curry spicemix

  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Parsely
  • Thyme
  • Oregano
  • Sage
  • chives
  • Marjoran
  • nutmeg
  • Dill
  • Mint
  • Tarragon
  • Mustard seeds
  • Juniper
  • poppy seeds

Plus cinnamon and saffron = 17 elements

Then I discovered Ras el Hanout, a north African spice mix. The variety I have contains the following 3 additional spices

  • Star anice
  • rose sprouts leaves
  • Lavender sprouts
  • Paradise grains (Aframomum melegueta)

So 17+4=21

21+15 in the Indian curry mix =36 spices

 

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I like paprika, since it helps with getting my Vitamin E recommended dose for the day (5g of paprika packs about 10% of DV, plus 70% or so of DV of Vitamin A).

I also sprinkle about 3-4g of Nigella Sativa (Black Cumin), just because it has been regarded as panacea in the ancient world and gives a little crunch to my beans (it's kind of an acquired taste, but I got used to it:) There are some interesting studies on it, like this one: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31331553

Edited by Ron Put

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