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Ideal strength to weight ratio for longevity


Vishranth Rg
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9 hours ago, Vishranth Rg said:

What is the ideal body weight exercise to measure strength to weight ratio? 

I'm not sure such a ratio would be very significant. For example, I may be able to do 30 pullups, but after training legs and butts for a while and gaining 10 pounds for example I'd be able to do less pullups but my upper body strength would be the same... But maybe I'm just dumb and didn't grasp the question in its entirety.

Clinton underlined pullups and pushups, I agree those two exercises are great, I added dips because you might do just 4 free body exercises and gain significant muscle mass: pullups, pushups, dips and squats. The best would be to do pullups, dips, bench press with a barbell or dumbells and squats, at the beginning without weight, then adding just a small 5 kg bag, then 10 kg, then a 15 kg sack or bag. Moderate weights but pretty effective. And you can do weighted dips and pullups after you are proficient with the unweighted exercises.

At the end of it, you may build up your own home gym with just a bench and a barbell and a few plates, one bar for pullups, bars for dips, bags and sacks with books, nothing more...

Pushups are good to start out with, but then they tend to become too easy, although they can be modified and leveraged.

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As an example of only focusing on these very simple but effective bodyweight exercises, an extremely effective workout can be as simple as push-ups, pull-ups, jump squats and running.  A 'famous' example of this is the well know (just google it) Navy SEAL 'Murph' workout (named after Lieutenant Michael Patrick Murphy) who was posthumously honored with 14 service medals including the Medal of Honor, Silver Star and Purple Heart (killed in 2005 in Afghanistan).

The Murph:

-a mile run followed by

-100 pull-ups

-200 push-ups

-300 air squats

-and another mile on the track

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On 1/14/2022 at 11:17 PM, Clinton said:

As an example of only focusing on these very simple but effective bodyweight exercises, an extremely effective workout can be as simple as push-ups, pull-ups, jump squats and running.  A 'famous' example of this is the well know (just google it) Navy SEAL 'Murph' workout (named after Lieutenant Michael Patrick Murphy) who was posthumously honored with 14 service medals including the Medal of Honor, Silver Star and Purple Heart (killed in 2005 in Afghanistan).

The Murph:

-a mile run followed by

-100 pull-ups

-200 push-ups

-300 air squats

-and another mile on the track

Doing this daily or even several times a week would wipe out any regular non-chemically enhanced person. That far too much volume. It would be better to split the routine as follows: a mile run + 10x10 pull ups; day off; mile run + 10x20 push ups; day off; mile run + 10x30 airsquats.

 

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Navy seals are not enhanced (at least were not)!

When I was a very young man, I didn't know what chemically enhanced was, but I remember 100 pushups were nothing to me. I could do 50 in a row and again 50 after one minute. Maybe a could do 100 in a row, I remember they were so easy I just felt nothing, even one-arm pushups felt easy.

I could do 30 pullups in a row but never went all out, I could have done probably a few hundred a day. A one mile run was nothing and I never did airsquats because it was like walking to me.

Compared to now, energies and recovery were orders of magnitude higher.

 

Edited by mccoy
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McCoy, 

The movie Lone Survivor (is on Netflix in Canada right now) stars Mark Walhberg as one of 4 Navy Seals on a mission in Afghanistan.  One of the Seals is Lt Murphy- based on the mission during which he was KIA.

Btw Alex,

 I used to lift iron every day during my lunch hour for years five days a week and still did at least 10x10 pull-ups and dips and 10x20 push-ups a night - not enhanced and never close to burnout… I didn’t do any cardio then but I had lots of energy and feel that I could have ran as well fwiw 

Clinton

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3 hours ago, Clinton said:

McCoy, 

The movie Lone Survivor (is on Netflix in Canada right now) stars Mark Walhberg as one of 4 Navy Seals on a mission in Afghanistan.  One of the Seals is Lt Murphy- based on the mission during which he was KIA.

Btw Alex,

 I used to lift iron every day during my lunch hour for years five days a week and still did at least 10x10 pull-ups and dips and 10x20 push-ups a night - not enhanced and never close to burnout… I didn’t do any cardio then but I had lots of energy and feel that I could have ran as well fwiw 

Clinton

Were you on CR? 

The reason why upwards of half of all new gym members end up quitting (in the American population), is because they get on similar high volume routines and burn out or feel like crap. 

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Alex,

I believe I was on Cr at that time- I had just discovered CR and was extremely motivated but didn’t know how to ensure Optimal Nutrition.  I was definitely consuming far less than what I needed and had very low body fat- perhaps 3-4%.

I no longer strive for true CR, however I do my ‘best’ and hover around borderline CR… I try to do CR maybe 2-4 days per week, with strict adherence to optimal nutrition, Time Restricted Feeding 16-8, and avoid Sugar Oil Salt with mostly Whole Foods Plant Based diet.

Clinton

Edited by Clinton
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11 hours ago, Clinton said:

McCoy, 

The movie Lone Survivor (is on Netflix in Canada right now) stars Mark Walhberg as one of 4 Navy Seals on a mission in Afghanistan.  One of the Seals is Lt Murphy- based on the mission during which he was KIA.

Clinton, I'm a fan of the navy seals like you probably are and have studied lots of publications on them, plus various podcasts especially the Jocko podcast.

I read Marcus Luttrel's book on which the film was based, and yes, I did not remember about Lieut. Murphy, one of the KIA, sorry for that. 

I didn't like the film. It was not too realistic and Luttrell's book is controversial. I studied other publications from the US Marines located in that area.  That mission was fatally destined to fail, badly planned, almost everything went wrong and the 4 seals have been defeated by not so many insurgents, who had the advantage of knowledge of terrain and position though.

I suggest this reading, after the reading of Luttrell's book:

 

Quote

Victory Point

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
Jump to navigationJump to search
Victory Point: Operations Red Wings and Whalers - The Marine Corps' Battle for Freedom in Afghanistan
Victory Point Cover.jpg
Cover of Victory Point
Author Ed Darack
Country United States
Language English
Subject Operation Red Wings and Operation Whalers
Genre Nonfiction
Publisher Berkley Books, a Division of The Penguin Group
Publication date
2009 Hardcover, 2010 Paperback
Media type Print (hardcover, paperback) and ebook
Pages 316 pg
ISBN 978-0-425-23259-0
OCLC 233549172
LC Class 2008047659

Victory Point: Operations Red Wings and Whalers - The Marine Corps' Battle for Freedom in Afghanistan is a nonfiction book by author Ed Darack published in hardcover in 2009 and in paperback in 2010 by The Berkley Publishing Group, an imprint of The Penguin Publishing Group. Victory Point comprehensively documents Operation Red Wings and Operation Whalers, two historically significant military operations that took place in the summer of 2005 in the Hindu Kush Mountains in Afghanistan's eastern Kunar Province.[1][2]

Victory Point tells the comprehensive story of Operation Red Wings including regional history of Afghanistan's Kunar Province, specifically, the Korangal Valley and other areas of and around the Pech District of this eastern Afghanistan province.[3] The book further provides background information about how Operation Red Wings evolved, including its purpose, and gives information on the leader of the target cell of the operation, Ahmad Shah, and how this information was uncovered. The book provides background on the command relationships among the various military entities involved in the operation, and discusses the ambush of the four Navy SEALs tasked as a reconnaissance and surveillance team for the opening of the operation. Victory Point further provides information on the shootdown of the U.S. Army Special Operations Command's 160th Special Operation's Aviation Regiment (Airborne) (SOAR(A)) MH-47 Special Operations Helicopter, which resulted in the deaths of 8 Navy SEALs and 8 Army Special Operations aviators, and the search for and recovery of Marcus Luttrell, the only survivor of the four-man Navy SEAL reconnaissance and surveillance team.[4][5]

Victory Point narrates the development and execution of the sequel to Operation Red Wings, Operation Whalers. Operation Whalers resulted in the serious injury of Ahmad Shah and forced Shah and his men into Pakistan after a series of intense firefights in a high, steep, and treacherous valley. Victory Point illustrates the complexities and difficulties of this successful operation, one that relied not only on traditional Marine Corps infantry tactics, but modern combined arms coordination, with assets including Army Air Ambulance, U.S. Air Force attack aircraft, U.S. Army intelligence, U.S. Army artillery, and U.S. Air Force logistical support.[2][4][5][6]

Author Ed Darack spent two months on the ground in Afghanistan with Marines in the region where Operation Red Wings and Operation Whalers took place for research for writing Victory Point.[2]

Victory Point has been noted for its detail and comprehensiveness with regard to both Operation Red Wings as well as Operation Whalers. Victory Point has also been noted for its comprehensive overview of the region in which these operations took place.[3][4][7] Victory Point has been cited in a number of books about the Afghan war.[8][9][10] Victory Point was chosen as one of the best books of 2009 by the United States Naval Institute.[7]

 

 

 

Edited by mccoy
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Thanks McCoy - that book looks like a dandy!   I've always been keen on special forces books, movies & info - especially Seals but also Green Beret's.

I did read all of Richard Marcinko's books on Navy Seal Team 6, starting with Rogue Warrior and Red Cell - that was actually my inspiration about 20yrs ago for joining the military 😉  - another lifetime ago - lol.  His history & involvement in the Navy Seals was significant and worth reading.  Btw it seemed from his perspective that at least the seals in Seal Team 6 were definitely enhanced - he made a comment (iirc) in Red Cell that all members on Team 6 could bb bench 500lbs.  Even if that is (almost certainly embellishment) anything over 350lbs would almost beyond a doubt require more than protein & 8hrs sleep 😉 

On that note - I find the amount that guys claim to be able to bench press (guys I've known, people online) hilarious.

Progression of the bench press world record - Wikipedia

Before 1916 the most any man on the planet had EVER bench pressed was 364lbs.

So when you have huge numbers (n is very large) of men trying to lift as heavy as possible (naturally) we can reasonably expect that the upper limit for an un-enhanced man's bench press is certainly below 400lbs.

Then ... it seems that athletes started using steroids as early as perhaps 1954:

When did athletes start using steroids? – TheKnowledgeBurrow.com

So what happens to the world record bench press at about the same time?? the world record bench press suddenly jumps to 500lbs in the 1950s!!

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Clinton
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7 hours ago, Clinton said:

Btw it seemed from his perspective that at least the seals in Seal Team 6 were definitely enhanced - he made a comment (iirc) in Red Cell that all members on Team 6 could bb bench 500lbs.  Even if that is (almost certainly embellishment) anything over 350lbs would almost beyond a doubt require more than protein & 8hrs sleep 😉 

Clinton, I didn't read Marcinko's books but I have reasons to believe that he hyped the facts a little. However, after the Vietnam war seals have been more or less 'in idle' until 9/11, so it is likely that some of'em took up weight lifting with some chemical enhancement. In combat situations, such enhancement would most probably be detrimental, since a huge muscle mass would not favor running and swimming and military ops in general. But I could be wrong, at least in a few cases.

For sure, great muscle mass would be detrimental in BUDS, the basic seals training, ending with the grueling hell week.

Nevertheless, I recognize that some use of chemicals like amphetamines may be very useful in successfully completing the hell week and using testosterone or other androgens may be an edge during BUDS. But probably that's cutting the edges or worse.

 

Edited by mccoy
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Re. bench pressing: yes, Julius Maddox pressing 783 lbs/355 kg is totally monstrous. And no way this is achievable without chemical enhancement. It's interesting though to know what the human body is capable of when pushed to extremes. 

 

 

 

Maddox.jpg

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