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Olive oil? Healthy or not?!


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5 hours ago, Mike41 said:

Olive oil is always compared to butter, margarine etc. not good enough imo

That's probably because of grants money. Junk diet is followed by tens of million people, so there is huge public interest in improving that. There seems to be far less interest in VLF diets, unsurprisingly because very few people follow, or would follow it. Hopefully someone will start studying it. It may even be that we don't know the right articles.

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Fat on modern day diet does seem to be detrimental BUT if for example (extreme case) a person is Keto then from what I'm reading (might be bias showing here), the body handles fat MUCH more differently to the advantageous of the person over any other macro nutrient.

Everyone is scared of Fat but that's still debatable whereas it's a statement of fact that carbs cause much damage inside our body, most of modern day civilisation would benefit from eating more fat and less carbs whereas the trend is increasing in ever more carbs and low fat foods being hailed as diet friendly foods.

People won't need to go on yo yo diets if they consumed ~100g carbs a day.

For reference I'm

Carbs:Protein:Fat

25:15:60

127g Fat (21g of which saturates)

76g Mono-unsaturates

21g Polyunsaturates

Edited by pwonline
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On 8/30/2022 at 2:51 PM, pwonline said:

Carbs:Protein:Fat

25:15:60

This is not really a diet that humans have eaten before, except in the Arctic. Methinks it may help with weight loss, at least in the short run, but long term it's likely to be rather detrimental to longevity.

https://nutritionstudies.org/is-the-ketogenic-diet-natural-for-humans/

And don't mistake whole food carbs for carbs from cake and potato chips.

https://www.sydney.edu.au/research/research-impact/the-secret-to-healthy-ageing-is-a-low-protein-high-carb-diet.html

 

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11 hours ago, Ron Put said:

This is not really a diet that humans have eaten before, except in the Arctic. Methinks it may help with weight loss, at least in the short run, but long term it's likely to be rather detrimental to longevity.

https://nutritionstudies.org/is-the-ketogenic-diet-natural-for-humans/

And don't mistake whole food carbs for carbs from cake and potato chips.

https://www.sydney.edu.au/research/research-impact/the-secret-to-healthy-ageing-is-a-low-protein-high-carb-diet.html

 

The keto article you posted is not relevant here, I'm not into state of ketosis indefinitely, I'm consuming 90g carbs in one sitting, though I don't get hungry whatsoever so I do wonder if I have a higher carb limit to remain in ketosis but I'm not sure. I eat only whole foods, none processed with no added sugar 

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1 hour ago, pwonline said:

The keto article you posted is not relevant here, I'm not into state of ketosis indefinitely, I'm consuming 90g carbs in one sitting, though I don't get hungry whatsoever so I do wonder if I have a higher carb limit to remain in ketosis but I'm not sure. I eat only whole foods, none processed with no added sugar 

You are consuming a higher fat diet than the Inuits did in the 1930s, if I recall correctly. Unless you have the Arctic gene mutation, which is found in almost 100% of the Inuit, a bit less than in 15% of the Hun Chinese and less than 2% of Europeans, it's unlikely that your diet promotes longevity. In fact, even with the mitigating mutation, Inuit mummies show that they had a fairly high percent of CVD and had a relatively short life expectancy.

But we each make individual dietary decisions and while based on my knowledge I am fairly certain that whole plant-based high carb diet is optimum for longevity, I may be also wrong. Time will tell, I guess.

For reference, my own intake over the last year is:

Carbs (whole): 60% 
Protein:             15%
Fat:                    25%

My carb intake is mostly sweet potatoes, tomatoes and squash, and about equally divided between fiber, starches and sugars, with virtually no added sugars.

My fat mostly from walnuts and almonds, with flax, avocado and chia as the top five sources. I wish I could bring it down to the teens, bt it's proving harder than I thought.

I am curious how long have you been on such high fat diet and how does your blood work look, and how is your insulin resistance?

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1 hour ago, Ron Put said:

You are consuming a higher fat diet than the Inuits did in the 1930s, if I recall correctly. Unless you have the Arctic gene mutation, which is found in almost 100% of the Inuit, a bit less than in 15% of the Hun Chinese and less than 2% of Europeans, it's unlikely that your diet promotes longevity. In fact, even with the mitigating mutation, Inuit mummies show that they had a fairly high percent of CVD and had a relatively short life expectancy.

But we each make individual dietary decisions and while based on my knowledge I am fairly certain that whole plant-based high carb diet is optimum for longevity, I may be also wrong. Time will tell, I guess.

For reference, my own intake over the last year is:

Carbs (whole): 60% 
Protein:             15%
Fat:                    25%

My carb intake is mostly sweet potatoes, tomatoes and squash, and about equally divided between fiber, starches and sugars, with virtually no added sugars.

My fat mostly from walnuts and almonds, with flax, avocado and chia as the top five sources. I wish I could bring it down to the teens, bt it's proving harder than I thought.

I am curious how long have you been on such high fat diet and how does your blood work look, and how is your insulin resistance?

I guess I've stuck on this diet for 1-2 months. I was consuming 180g pot barley with 180g red lentils and I think ~60g Extra virgin Olive Oil.

I wanted to get my carbs and protein lower so I then did 140g pot barley , 140g red lentils and increased my Evoo to get me to my target of 1850 calories. My body after the first big drop (20g both barley and lentils) almost had an episode of Diarrhea, I've been there and didn't want to risk cranking up my EVOO to soon, so each week I dropped 5g from my legumes and barley and upped my EVOO, worked out at around 2 grams each week I add.

I'm currently at 105g barley, 105g red lentils, with my

Carbs: 92g

Protein: 72g

fat: 130g

 

I went extreme keto for a month and know the adaptation phase well and I believe I'm experiencing this again with this diet. It's been  almost 3 weeks of this diet strict where I noticed my hunger levels have gone to zero and my energy levels have plummeted, I might not look it but I'm working real hard just to walk a normal pace, it feels like such an effort that I've learnt only to move the limbs that need moving and relax the limbs that don't.

I want to get to 90g lentils/legumes which would get me to 105g EVOO! at that point just the EVOO would account for exactly 50% of my daily intake. I drink it first thing in my meal, measure it in a glass and drink it in 5 shots.

I'm doing OMAD. My weight is either steady at 105 pounds and is slowly gaining weight. I'm currently at 17 bmi.

I'm not sure if I want to increase my BMI to 18.5, I actually feel fine though have noticed my hair has started thinning and falling of but not aggressively. I want to see this experiment through to 3 months.

If I'm correct then my mitochondria would have gone through full6 cycles (2 week per cycle) which means they should be fully adapted and I'll burn fat very efficiently allowing me to tap more into my ketones from the fat.

I haven't done any bloodwork on my current diet. I also consuming 40g of fibre from my diet a day. I've been eating the same meal for 2-3 months, just varying the EVOO and my carbs (lentils/barley)

 

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PWonline, your diet is very interesting and incredibly simple, just 3 ingredients, I love it as I would love a minimalistic work of art.

I assume of course that you are supplementing all the missing micronutrients, like B complex vitamins, C vitamin, Calcium, retinol which is nihil in your regime, and so on. 

Some of your amminoacids are just at borderline RDAs and methionine is low. Maybe too low.

I would not worry at all for your EVOO consumption, since it's all monousaturated fats, but I'm not very surprised that your energy is not optimal.

I also hope you've checked your bloodworks...

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  • 4 months later...

the polyphenols content is high, but not exceptionally high, if we are speaking about the subset of hi-poly EVOOS.

This I read on the Kosterina site.

image.png.a0e6bdf584951da40ef273c21ad40771.png

 

Oilalà Coratina oil, grown in Italy not so far from my place, in its latest crop has about 550 mg/kg of polyphenol content. Maybe Kosterina has a better taste but here Oilalà costs about one fifth of the kosterina prices I saw online (16 Euros per liter). Oilalà ships to the USA, free of charge for orders of at least 450 Euros (you must buy at least six 5-liters packs). The bag in box solution has an optimized preservation of the polyphenols.

This year I bought from a local producer of organic EVOO, with a lower polyphenols content and almost half the price of Oilalà. I eat so much of it that I make up for the lesser polyphenols.

Microplastics: the producers apparently are still ignoring this very recent aspect.

 

 

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