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Moderate CR provides benefits in humans


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This study found health span benefits for moderate calorie restriction in humans.

Calorie reduction lowers protein linked to the aging process

In a new study, Yale researchers show that moderate calorie restriction in people reduces the production of a protein called SPARC, which then reins in harmful inflammation and improves health in the aged.

In the new study, Dixit and his co-authors further analyzed data from a clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. In the trial, known as Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy (CALERIE), some participants reduced their calorie intake by 14% for two years, while others ate as usual; researchers then tracked the long-term health effects.

Looking for genetic changes in participants' fat tissue after one and two years, they found that those who consumed fewer calories had reduced amounts of a protein called SPARC—or secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine—which has been linked to obesity, diabetes, and inflammation.

The researchers found that SPARC triggered inflammation by converting anti-inflammatory immune cells called macrophages into a pro-inflammatory state. However, lowering SPARC production by fat cells in mice reduced inflammation, improved metabolism, and extended their health span as they aged.

"We now have a better understanding of how SPARC affects inflammation and health span by acting on macrophages," he added. "And it may be a useful target for inducing the health benefits of calorie restriction without having to actually alter calorie intake."

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  • 2 weeks later...

For me, in summary, I had a heart attack, https://www.healthline.com/health/widowmaker-heart-attack, on June 14; went to the hospital via taxi thinking the pain was in the stomach so was in the ER waiting room longer than I should have, was given a stent and a pacemaker; developed pneumonia in the hospital, which as treated with antibiotics; developed extensive edema; got fluid in the lungs, such that 630 ml fluid was drained from the right lung at one point; found out that my right lung, middle lobe had collapsed into basically dead tissue -- they could remove it if I was younger and healthier, but it's collapse does provide a little more room for the remaining right lung lobes to function; developed sepsis for which I got iv antibiotics through iv ports that needed many changes and antibiotic (they checked the source of infection and it was found to be staphyloccus aureus and tested so the best antibiotic could be used) which caused much searing pain until a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line) was inserted such that I was able to come home.  I am on antibiotic until Sept. 7.

While being in the hospital I got a large appreciation of what life has afforded to me.  I saw the protesting mob being tear gassed in Chicago when Nixon was visiting; the Prince of Monte Carlo being driven by in the Rolls Royce and the Monte Carlo races from a vantage point in the cheap seats some distance up the amphitheatre-like hill side above the city – we got a good view of all the cars zigzagging through the streets of the city; at 12 years of age I saw the governor general walk down the aisle in Toronto in the tallest building in the British Empire at the time, as well as a Toronto Maple Leafs game and the Grey Cup; I have seen in my and Mary’s lab the planning and execution of exciting research by great minds; I have lived in the Netherlands, Port Alberni; at UBC over four academic years; Saskatchewan for 20 months doing mMSc; Dundas Ontario for 3.5 years doing my PhD; further postdoctoral training in Hershey, PA, Chicago and Newark NJ, over 9 years in the US; 18 years in Newfoundland while rising to the position of professor; 12 years with Mom in Port Alberni; and now 7 years in Saskatchewan.

And, I am still standing; I’m not dead yet.

Onwards.

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Al,

I’m very sorry to hear about your medical challenges and wish you a speedy recovery.  I had noticed your absence for the last couple of months but assumed it was a well earned hiatus.  I appreciate all your research and contributions through the years.  You have really enriched my (and I think everyone else’s) experience and knowledge of CR.  If you’re up to it, please share with us what you’re doing to enhance your recovery and with what you know now would you have done differently over the last five to ten years. 

Best wishes,

Cory

 

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Thank you all, very much for your kind words.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staphylococcus_aureus is a fairly common bacterium on people.  My brother got sepsis, then needed a valve replacement for infection in the heart, but for me they looked for heart and pacemaker lead infection by ECC endoscopy and it was clear and blood culture for the bacteria was negative some weeks ago.  My heart's ejection fraction was 27% versus normal 50-65% when tested a month or so ago; it will be tested again in a few months.  My appetite remains poor, I think because of the antibiotics and I have lost about 15 pounds.

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3 hours ago, AlanPater said:

My appetite remains poor, I think because of the antibiotics and I have lost about 15 pounds.

We've speculated hypothetically in the past that practicing severe CR may be detrimental when/if one ever gets sick, since being so thin leaves one with few metabolic reserves when one needs to fight off an infection and/or heal from an injury. It sucks that you have had to endure such health challenges first hand.

Your most recent blood tests report from about a year ago had you at a BMI of 22.2, up from a much, much lower point a few years ago when you were practicing what I consider (too) severe CR.

It seems to me that it was a wise decision to gain weight and I'm wondering if you agree. Losing 15 lbs at a point where you were practicing your most severe CR and were at your thinnest would probably have made it much more difficult to survive and recover from your health challenges.

Do you agree that having more in the way of metabolic reserves was beneficial when you were faced with a situation where you body needs to heal and fight off infections, while having a tough time getting the nutrition it needs?

--Dean

 

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Al I am so sorry sorry to hear about your misfortune. I myself had open heart surgery due to a failed aortic valve due to rheumatic fever in my youth so I can certainly empathize. When one faces their mortality as you have and recovers I believe it is more likely they will appreciate life and also consider the awe of reality and perhaps have a more spiritual leaning.As Socrates  said years ago “The beginning of wisdom is to know that I don’t know.” The arrogance of Atheists amuses me no end. Many of my freinds are this way. Cocky and sel assured. I certainly understand this view when considering the idiotic view of a Santa Claus God Figure. But to outright deny the idea that there may indeed be a meaning to our existence and an order of reality that we do not and cannot put under a microscope is to me arrogance and closed mindedness. The physicist David Bohm tried to address this with an eye toward the conundrum of quantum physics in his book “Wholeness and the implicate order.” He felt that the conundrum could be explained by recognizing the underlying principals.

According to Bohm, insight is pure perception. Because of the low level of our ego development (manifested by our grandiosity, our emotional fears and pressures, our ignorant worldviews, and our gross extraversion), this insight is more than often deflected by a closed mind. The opposite of the closed mind is the openness to interiority. Human beings must look within in order to meet and scrutinize universal insight.

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1 hour ago, Saul said:

Dean,

When someone is badly sick, if you want to do well, you don't criticize what you think they might have done better.

  --  Saul

Saul,

Per usual, you've misread / misinterpreted :-). 

I wasn't criticizing Al. In fact, I was complementing him for choosing to put on some weight over the last few years in order to be better prepared to deal with exactly the kind of adversity his has unfortunately been going through recently.

--Dean

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56 minutes ago, Dean Pomerleau said:

Saul,

Per usual, you've misread / misinterpreted :-). 

I wasn't criticizing Al. In fact, I was complementing him for choosing to put on some weight over the last few years in order to be better prepared to deal with exactly the kind of adversity his has unfortunately been going through recently.

--Dean

Yeah1

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