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Hi Dean!

Your diet seems great to me, as usual -- also, as I recall, you eat one meal a day -- probably a good idea.

  --  Saul

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I concur that Olive leaves may be a great idea , although in previous posts I was refering specifically to foods, whereas leaves and other supplements are not usually regarded as such.

Table olives have the obvious drawback of heterogeneity of content, and usually TPs are not available wheras in EVOO this info can be retrieved or even a sample sent to the lab where the tests are routine (I don't know abut olives). And, as written in another thead by Dean, NaOH curing or immersion in brine or other processing may sure alter the original content.

I've been quickly browsing olive leaves in Italian and it seems that it is well known as an herbal medicine. Extreme bitterness is cited as a major drawback, but it apaprently carries many, many benefits.

Some people associate the richness of secoiridoids to the longevity of the olive tree.

The Luras wild olive in Sardinia, Italy, has an estimated age o 3000 to 4000 years:

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I

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I'm definitely leaning toward taking advantage of the properties of OLEs, after I've gathered some info. Maybe, as Sibiriak was thinking, adding olive leaves to EVOO may leverage the benefits of secoiridoids.

I've also seen there are quite a few non-alcoholic extracts in liquid form.

Edited by mccoy

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On 5/31/2019 at 7:43 AM, Ron Put said:

It's actually ironic that any weight is placed on it by people who are willing to disregard the considerable evidence that while EVOO may be BETTER than most common alternative dietary fats (animal or vegetable derived), it is nevertheless another processed fat, even if overall less harmful unless consumed only occasionally.  I'll repost a reputable source, for good measure:

"...any oil—including olive oil—is not a whole food and thus has little place in a whole food, plant-based diet. Like any other oil, olive oil is a processed, concentrated fat extract and thus has lost most of the nutritional value of its original form (the olive itself). If you want some nutritional value, you will find it by eating the whole olive—not by consuming it in its almost unrecognizable extracted oil form....

I agree that EVOO is not a whole food but, then, the supporters of this idea should only eat whole cereals. No bread, pasta, processed products. No soy milk, tofu, tempeh, only whole legumes. No cacao, coffe, tea, And so on and so forth. If said supporters are coherent with their talks at least I admire them for their stoicism.

Edited by mccoy

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I'm going to add any further considerations on OLe and OLP on the other thread linked by Dean, here it's a little OT.

My impression at present is that the OLE-OLP alternative to EVOO sure seems worthy to be explored. Caveats from MR still needing to be addressed thoroughly

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19 hours ago, mccoy said:

I agree that EVOO is not a whole food but, then, the supporters of this idea should only eat whole cereals. No bread, pasta, processed products. No soy milk, tofu, tempeh, only whole legumes. No cacao, coffe, tea, And so on and so forth. If said supporters are coherent with their talks at least I admire them for their stoicism.

And eating whole grains (steel cut oats, ground flax, etc.) is not such a bad idea.... One also does not have to regularly eat bread or pasta, in fact I almost never buy those at home. I do indulge when I go out, just as I do with olive oil if at a restaurant which serves it (and I feel weak that evening :) I enjoy cacao nibs daily, and it's worth noting that coffee and tea don't come wrapped in a sea of fat....

I also try not to eat desert, but I do that too, probably once a month or so. Many others seem to practice the same, and it's not all that hard or inconvenient.

Perhaps the analogy between EVOO and whole wheat bread is not that far fetched -- both are fine as replacements (EVOO to animal and most processed vegetable fats, and whole wheat bread to something like Wonder Bread).

As to the objections to olive leaf extract made above, the most damning was ""Hydroxytyrosol administration enhances atherosclerotic lesion development in apo E deficient mice" and after reading it, I am comfortable that it does not apply to most of us.

There were some bioavailability questions, but after a quick search I found a number of studies showing high human bioavailability from olive leaf extract (I posted a couple above). I did not find any studies which found low human bioavailability, BTW.

This is not an argument, I am merely trying to present the best facts I can find (if someone has better, I am happy to consider them) and each persons who reads them can make their own decisions.

Cheers.

Edited by Ron Put

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I never eat pasta or bread. I do eat oatmeal, 100% whole grain cereal, fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, coffee black, 1/2 cup Greek yogurt, 1 oz. salmon daily and one oyster for zinc. I found a milk product made with oats and bananas (yes very processed) it has no added calcium. Too much calcium is atherogenic and almond milks have tons of added calcium. So primarily Whole Foods but not entirely. Oh btw red wine daily and that is certainly processed.

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Yes, as you rightly point out, everything if not raw and untreated is processed.

The vegan doctors affirming that EVOO is processed wheras olives are natural seem to ignore that olives are cured in NAOH or cooked and that EVOO is press-filtered at low temperatures, so the beneficial chemicals are probably much more in the natural state in EVOO than in olives. Of course there is no fiber but this we usually ingest in ample amounts by vegetables, legumes and other food.

Also, unprocessed grains should be raw. Legumes, ditto. Cooking is by definition a processing procedure, which by the way makes grains and legumes digestible, but it is a processing nevertheless.

So not all processing is deleterious. I think the above would suggest a situation of religious fanaticism even by well respected MDs. The religion is the diet and the subjective beliefs on nutrition, sometimes are not really founded in science or even in basic rational thinking.

 

 

Edited by mccoy

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